Dr. Tom Coon, Director of MSU Extension asked me to forward this to the organic listserv readers. If you use barley straw in your ponds it would be great if you could respond.

Thanks

Vicki Morrone
Subject: Barley Straw study/survey

 

Dear Dr. Coon,
    My name is Felicity Francis and I am a graduate student at Hood College
in Frederick, Maryland.  To complete my Master's degree in Environmental
Biology, I am working on a project to gauge the effectiveness of barley
straw as an algistatic agent in aquatic environments.  I am trying to locate
aquatic managers or others who have used barley straw and would be willing
to complete a survey to gauge the success of this method in controlling
algae.  I am hoping you may have information and/or contacts that will
assist me in completing this project.   The survey can be sent
electronically or via the postal service. Along with this email address,
other contact information is as follows:
Felicity Francis
2 Hill Circle
Round Hill, VA 20141
Home phone:  540-338-4828
[log in to unmask]
[log in to unmask]
    Thank you for your attention to this matter.  I am looking forward to
hearing from you.

Sincerely,

Felicity Francis

If you would like to access a searchable archive of the all the previous Mich-Organic listserv postings copy this URL and paste in your browser address field http://list.msu.edu/archives/mich-organic.html ------_=_NextPart_001_01C6A42A.1C1F2E70-- ========================================================================Date: Mon, 10 Jul 2006 14:55:03 -0400 Reply-To: Vicki Morrone <[log in to unmask]> Sender: MI organic growers seeking info and ideas <[log in to unmask]> From: Vicki Morrone <[log in to unmask]> Subject: FW: Monday, July 10 is the DEADLINE for registering to vote in the August 8th Primary MIME-Version: 1.0 Content-Type: multipart/alternative; boundary="----_=_NextPart_001_01C6A452.5AC92A0D" This is a multi-part message in MIME format. ------_=_NextPart_001_01C6A452.5AC92A0D Content-Type: text/plain; charset="US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable ________________________________ Subject: Monday, July 10 is the DEADLINE for registering to vote in the August 8th Primary VOTING: A RIGHT AND AN ADVOCATES DUTY ARE YOU READY? Theres a saying around Lansing that your best lobbying is done on Election Day. This will especially be true this year as Michigan voters choose who will fill the following positions: Governor, Lt. Governor, Secretary of State and Attorney General, all 15 of Michigans seats in the U.S. House of Representatives, one U.S. Senate Seat, 110 state Representatives, 38 state Senators, as well as other offices including county commissioners, State Supreme Court justices, and educational boards. As you may already know, in order to vote you must be 18 years old by August 8, 2006, a U.S. citizen, and a resident of Michigan and the city or township where you plan to vote. Residents can register to vote at their county, city or township clerks office, at any Secretary of State branch office, or by completing a mail-in voter registration form. Mail-in forms may be obtained from county and local clerks. Forms are also available on the Secretary of State Web site at www.Michigan.gov/sos. What you may not know is just how important your vote is in both the primary and general elections. Because of the partisan composition of our state, some estimate that 90% of the eventual winners in the general election will be decided on Primary Election day, August 8. Because so few voters show up (or use absentee ballots) for primary elections, your vote has extra impact. With so much at stake in economic development, land use, local control over agricultural practices, and other critical issues facing our state, voting is more important than ever. Are you ready? Use the following checklist, take action if needed, and make sure your voice is heard and your vote counted: I am registered to vote. Last day to register to vote in August Primary Elections: Monday, July 10, 2006 Last day to register to vote in the November General Elections: Tuesday, October 10, 2006 I am ready to vote. Primary Elections: Tuesday, August 8, 2006 General Elections: Tuesday, November 7, 2006 Dont let anyone tell you that your vote doesnt count. It does, especially this year. Are you ready? Two great websites for voters: http://www.michigan.gov/sos/0,1607,7-127-1633_11619_38093-123989--,00.ht ml http://www.publius.org/ Food for thought: When the polls open on Election Day, every citizen over the age of 18 will be able to cast a vote. It is a right we take for granted, one that defines our nation as a democracy. But universal suffrage letting everyone vote did not appear overnight with the ratification of our Constitution. Two hundred years ago, you had to be white, male, and wealthy in order to vote. Many people dedicated their lives to changing that fact. Without them, suffrage might still be the privilege of a chosen few.(Todd Olson, Scholastic Update, 2006) If you would like to access previous postings to the Mich-Organic listserv you can copy and paste the following URL into your browser address bar http://list.msu.edu/archives/mich-organic.html ------_=_NextPart_001_01C6A452.5AC92A0D Content-Type: text/html; charset="US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable

 

 



Subject: Monday, July 10 is the DEADLINE for registering to vote in the August 8th Primary

 

VOTING: A RIGHT AND AN ADVOCATES DUTY

 

ARE YOU READY?

 

Theres a saying around Lansing that your best lobbying is done on Election Day. This will especially be true this year as Michigan voters choose who will fill the following positions: Governor, Lt. Governor, Secretary of State and Attorney General, all 15 of Michigans seats in the U.S. House of Representatives, one U.S. Senate Seat, 110 state Representatives, 38 state Senators, as well as other offices including county commissioners, State Supreme Court justices, and educational boards.

 

As you may already know, in order to vote you must be 18 years old by August 8, 2006,  a U.S. citizen, and a resident of Michigan and the city or township where you plan to vote. Residents can register to vote at their county, city or township clerks office, at any Secretary of State branch office, or by completing a mail-in voter registration form. Mail-in forms may be obtained from county and local clerks. Forms are also available on the Secretary of State Web site at www.Michigan.gov/sos.

 

What you may not know is just how important your vote is in both the primary and general elections. Because of the partisan composition of our state, some estimate that 90% of the eventual winners in the general election will be decided on Primary Election day,  August 8. Because so few voters show up (or use absentee ballots) for primary elections, your vote has extra impact.

 

With so much at stake in economic development, land use, local control over agricultural practices, and other critical issues facing our state, voting is more important than ever.  Are you ready?  Use the following checklist, take action if needed, and make sure your voice is heard and your vote counted:

 

I am registered to vote.

Last day to register to vote in August Primary Elections:

Monday, July 10, 2006

Last day to register to vote in the November     General Elections:

Tuesday, October 10,   2006

 

I am ready to vote.

Primary Elections: Tuesday, August 8, 2006

General Elections: Tuesday, November 7, 2006

 

Dont let anyone tell you that your vote doesnt count. It does, especially this year. Are you ready?

 

Two great websites for voters:

http://www.michigan.gov/sos/0,1607,7-127-1633_11619_38093-123989--,00.html

 

 http://www.publius.org/

 

Food for thought:

 When the polls open on Election Day, every citizen over the age of 18 will be able to cast a vote. It is a right we take for granted, one that defines our nation as a democracy. But universal suffrage  letting everyone vote  did not appear overnight with the ratification of our Constitution. Two hundred years ago, you had to be white, male, and wealthy in order to vote. Many people dedicated their lives to changing that fact. Without them, suffrage might still be the privilege of a chosen few.(Todd Olson, Scholastic Update, 2006)

 

 

 

 

If you would like to access a searchable archive of the all the previous Mich-Organic listserv postings copy this URL and paste in your browser address field http://list.msu.edu/archives/mich-organic.html ------_=_NextPart_001_01C6A452.5AC92A0D-- ========================================================================Date: Tue, 18 Jul 2006 11:10:35 -0400 Reply-To: Vicki Morrone <[log in to unmask]> Sender: MI organic growers seeking info and ideas <[log in to unmask]> From: Vicki Morrone <[log in to unmask]> Subject: Mich organic news for July 10-17 (1 of 3) MIME-Version: 1.0 Content-Type: multipart/related; boundary="----_=_NextPart_001_01C6AA7C.52CF6DF7"; type="multipart/alternative" This is a multi-part message in MIME format. ------_=_NextPart_001_01C6AA7C.52CF6DF7 Content-Type: multipart/alternative; boundary="----_=_NextPart_002_01C6AA7C.52CF6DF7" ------_=_NextPart_002_01C6AA7C.52CF6DF7 Content-Type: text/plain; charset="US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable What's new for Michigan Organic Growers for week of July 10-15 1. Demand for Organic Food Outstrips Supply 2. Stop the commercial planting of genetically engineered plums - the first temperate GE tree! 3. Grand Rapids Farmers market returns 4. Second annual field day on Enhancing Beneficial Insects with Native Plants -Aug 1, 2006 5. Inconsistent Weed Control With Glycophosate Reported 6. Rust Movement Remains Minuscule 7. Julberty's Dairy has been bought out by Dean's -the huge dairy conglomerate, of dubious fame. 8. Vegetable Scouting Report for week of July 10-15-from Cornell University 9. Take a look at this issue of New Ag Network 10. Soil Building and Organic Market Workshop ******************************************************* 1. Published on Friday, July 7, 2006 by the Associated Press Demand for Organic Food Outstrips Supply by Libby Quaid America's appetite for organic food is so strong that supply just can't keep up with demand. Organic products still have only a tiny slice, about 2.5 percent, of the nation's food market. But the slice is expanding at a feverish pace. Growth in sales of organic food has been 15 percent to 21 percent each year, compared with 2 percent to 4 percent for total food sales. Organic means food is grown without bug killer, fertilizer, hormones, antibiotics or biotechnology. Mainstream supermarkets, eyeing the success of organic retailers such as Whole Foods, have rushed to meet demand. The Kroger Co., Safeway Inc. and SuperValu Inc., which owns Albertson's LLC, are among those selling their own organic brands. Wal-Mart Stores Inc. said earlier this year it would double its organic offerings. The number of organic farms an estimated 10,000 is also increasing, but not fast enough. As a result, organic manufacturers are looking for ingredients outside the United States in places like Europe, Bolivia, Venezuela and South Africa. That is no surprise, said Barbara Robinson, head of the Agriculture Department's National Organic Program. The program provides the round, green "USDA Organic" seal for certified products. Her agency is just now starting to track organic data, but Robinson believes the United States is importing far more organic food than it exports. That's true of conventional food, too. "That is how you stimulate growth, is imports generally," she said. "Your own industry says we're tired of importing this; why should I pay for imports when I could start producing myself?" "We're doing a lot of scrambling," said Sheryl O'Loughlin, CEO of Clif Bar Inc. "We have gotten to the point now where we know we can get a call for any ingredient." The makers of the high-energy, eat-and-run Clif Bar needed 85,000 pounds of almonds, and they had to be organic. But the nation's organic almond crop was spoken for. Eventually, Clif Bar found the almonds in Spain. But more shortages have popped up: apricots and blueberries, cashews and hazelnuts, brown rice syrup and oats. Even Stonyfield Farm, an organic pioneer in the United States, is pursuing a foreign supplier; Stonyfield is working on a deal to import milk powder from New Zealand. "I'm not suggesting we would be importing from all these places," said Gary Hirshberg, president and CEO of Stonyfield Farm Inc. "But for transition purposes, to help organic supply to keep up with the nation's growing hunger, these countries have to be considered." The dilemma of how to fill the gap between organic supply and demand is part of a long-running debate within America's booming organic industry. For many enthusiasts, organic is about more than the food on their plates; it's a way to improve the environment where they live and help keep small-scale farmers in business. "If organic is something created in the image of sustainable agriculture, we certainly haven't accomplished that yet," said Urvashi Rangan, a scientist for Consumers Union. "What people do have to understand is if that stuff comes in from overseas, and it's got an organic label on it, it had to meet USDA standards in order to get here." The issue causes mixed feelings for Travis Forgues, an organic dairy farmer in Vermont. "I don't like the idea of it coming in from out of this country, but I don't want them to stop growing organic because of that," Forgues said. "I want people to say, `Let's do that here, give a farmer another avenue to make a livable wage.'" A member of the farmer-owned Organic Valley cooperative, Forgues got his dairy farm certified nearly 10 years ago. Organic Valley supplies milk to Stonyfield. Switching to organic is a difficult proposition. Vegetable grower Scott Woodard is learning through trial and error on his Putnam Valley, N.Y., farm. One costly mistake: Conventional farmers can plant seeds when they want and use pesticides to kill hungry insect larvae. If Woodard had waited three weeks to plant, the bugs that ate his seeds would have hatched and left. Organic seeds can be double the price of conventional. "There's not a lot of information out there," Woodard said. "We try to do the best we can. Sometimes it's too late, but then we learn for next time." Stonyfield and Organic Valley are working to increase the number of organic farms, paying farmers to help them switch or boost production. Stonyfield, together with farmer-owned cooperative Organic Valley, expects to spend around $2 million on incentives and technical help in 2006, Hirshberg said. Other companies offer similar help. And the industry's Organic Trade Association is trying to become more of a resource for individual farmers. Caren Wilcox, the group's executive director, described how an Illinois farmer showed up in May at an industry show in Chicago. "He said, `I want to get certified. Help me,'" Wilcox said. "It was a smart thing to do, but the fact that he had to get into his car and go down to McCormick Center says something about the availability of information." In the meantime, manufacturers like Clif Bar and Stonyfield still prefer to buy organic ingredients, wherever they come from, instead of conventional crops in the U.S. "Anybody who's helping to take toxins out of the biosphere and use less poisonous chemicals in agriculture is a hero of mine," Hirshberg said. "There's enormous opportunity here for everybody to win, large and small." Copyright (c) 2006 The Associated Press 2. Stop the commercial planting of genetically engineered plums - the first temperate GE tree! The US Department of Agriculture is accepting public comments between now and Saturday, July 17, 2006 on a petition that would allow commercial growing and marketing of the first genetically engineered (GE) plum trees. If approved, this would remove all regulatory oversight of this GE variety by USDA, a virus-resistant plum tree known as the Honey Sweet Pox Potyvirus Resistant plum. This would open the door to GE varieties of many other related stone fruits, such as peaches, apricots, cherries and almonds, that are susceptible to the same virus. Ironically, this virus is not even found in the US today according to the USDA, and is certainly not a significant agricultural problem here. The USDA admits that this GE plum will contaminate both organic and conventional non-genetically engineered plum orchards if it is approved. Since all commercial plum trees are cultivars that are relatively cross compatible within the same species, Prunus domestica, contamination via GE plum pollen carried by bees and other insects will infiltrate the plum orchards of organic and conventional growers. The proposed buffer zones between GE plums and other plums will not prevent genetic contamination from being spread by pollinating insects. Because this GE plum tree is also the first genetically engineered temperate tree proposed for commercial planting, it also opens the door to the commercialization of GE varieties of other temperate trees such as poplars, pines, and walnuts. The one GE fruit tree that has previously been approved, a virus resistant Hawaiian papaya, has caused extensive contamination of organic, conventional and wild papaya orchards on most of the Hawaiian Islands in just a few years. This contamination has spread far more quickly than the USDA predicted in its initial assessment. Once native and cultivated plum varieties are contaminated with transgenic pollen, and the resulting seeds are planted, there is no calling it back. This petition has implications for all other GE tree species, as the USDA and the industry want to gauge what the public's reaction will be. It is critical that all concerned about the threat of GE foods and GE trees respond to this USDA petition. Several hundred field trials of GE trees have been conducted already, many for forest trees, such as Poplar, Loblolly Pine, and Sweetgum, that grow on millions of acres in natural environments in the U.S. [Sample Comments to submit below. Please add any additional comments of your own, but remember to include the docket # at the top of your comments.] The following comments are in reference to Docket No. APHIS-2006-0084. I oppose the deregulation of genetically engineered plum trees for the following reasons: 1. Genetic contamination is a serious threat. Flowers and fruit in organic and conventional plum orchards will become contaminated with GE plum genes via pollen transported by bees and other insects that travel several miles in search of pollen. The result is that organic and conventional plum growers will lose their markets for non-GE plums as DNA testing confirms the contamination, as it has with GE papayas in Hawaii. An organic tree might remain organic itself, but the seeds will become contaminated, and the trees planted from these seeds will have contaminated fruit. 2. The approval of GE plums would be a precedent setting step by USDA, opening the floodgates for more GE trees including fruit, nut, ornamental, paper-pulp, and timber species, as well as trees engineered for soil remediation, and other traits. Approximately 80 species and varieties of trees are currently undergoing gene splicing research and development for commercial use. Many of these are native species important to ecosystems in much of the U.S. 3. There is a serious concern about the genetic stability of the inserted genes in GE plum trees. USDA claims that the plum pox viral resistance gene and other inserted genes are sufficiently genetically stable, but the testing has only been performed over ten years and not the entire pollen-producing life span of a plum tree. 4. The plum pox virus is not currently known to exist in the US as a problem for plum growers. Thus there is no justification for exposing other trees, plants, insects and people to the various hazards posed by GE plums. 5. The deregulatory petition completely ignores potential effects on bees and other pollinator species. Although unintended effects are common in GE crops there is very little assessment of possible environmental impacts from unintended effects. There are no studies that would allow us to evaluate the potential hazards of GE tree pollen for a variety of insects, or for consumers of honey. We also do not know how animals and insects that browse on plum leaves might be affected. 6. The USDA's environmental assessment admits that the GE plum readily hybridizes within its species. Thus, there may be a significant potential for gene flow into native plum varieties. Wild plum trees are perennial species living for several decades and populations exist in dozens of states from coast to coast. GE plum trees will be long lived, and capable of contaminating orchards and native plum tree populations for several decades. One GE plum tree will be able to produce thousands of GE seeds and extensive quantities of GE pollen, and will be capable of spreading fertile GE plum seeds and pollen into the environment for many years. The petition did not adequately evaluate the relative fitness of GE plum varieties as compared to native plums; it is possible that the GE varieties would become more successful in natural settings, and out-compete non-GE varieties. The USDA claim that contamination would be positive by reducing potential reservoirs for harboring the plum pox virus in the wild is unsupported by any data. 7. There has been no short-term or long-term safety testing or feeding trials for toxicity and other adverse effects of the genes inserted into the GE plum trees. GE plums have not been tested on animals, birds or humans for safety. Toxicity tests are necessary since unintended genetic effects are known to occur with gene splicing. USDA has ignored the need for scientific studies of gene splicing and for comprehensive studies of the environmental consequences of GE plantings. The US Department of Agriculture is accepting public comments between now and Saturday, July 17, 2006 on the petition to formally deregulate and allow commercial growing and marketing of GE plums. We apologize for the inconvenient process to submit your comments - the USDA is no longer accepting public comment via email or fax. To submit a comment using the Internet, go to http://www.regulations.gov . In the "Agency" box, select "Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service" from the drop-down menu; select "NOTICES" as the Document Type and APHIS-2006-0084 as the "Keyword or ID." Then press "submit" to submit or view public comments as well as the agency's supporting materials; click just beneath "Add Comments" and scroll down to submit your letter. To submit your comments via mail, make sure your letter is postmarked no later than Saturday, July 17th, and send an original and three copies with your name and address to Docket No. APHIS-2006-0084, Regulatory Analysis and Development, PPD, APHIS, Station 3A-03.8, 4700 River Road, Unit 118, Riverdale, MD 20737-1238. Feel free to copy and paste any or all of the 7 points above, along with any comments of your own. Please forward this widely among your friends and other contacts. ________________________________ Visit the web address below to tell your friends about this. Tell-a-friend! If you received this message from a friend, you can sign up for Center for Food Safety . This message was sent to [log in to unmask] Visit your subscription management page to modify your email communication preferences or update your personal profile. To stop ALL email from Center for Food Safety, click to remove yourself from our lists (or reply via email with "remove" in the subject line). Vicki Morrone Organic Vegetable and Crop Outreach Specialist Michigan State University C.S. Mott Sustainable Food Systems 303 Natural Resources Bldg. East Lansing, MI 48824 517-353-3542 517-282-3557 (cell) 517-353-3834 (fax) If you would like to access previous postings to the Mich-Organic listserv you can copy and paste the following URL into your browser address bar http://list.msu.edu/archives/mich-organic.html ------_=_NextPart_002_01C6AA7C.52CF6DF7 Content-Type: text/html; charset="US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable

 

What’s new for Michigan Organic Growers for week of July 10-15

 

1. Demand for Organic Food Outstrips Supply

 

2. Stop the commercial planting of genetically engineered plums - the first temperate GE tree!

 

3. Grand Rapids  Farmers market returns

 

4. Second annual field day on Enhancing Beneficial Insects with Native Plants –Aug 1, 2006

 

5.  Inconsistent Weed Control With Glycophosate Reported

 

6.   Rust Movement Remains Minuscule

 

7. Julberty’s Dairy has been  bought out by Dean's -the huge dairy conglomerate, of dubious fame. 

 

8.  Vegetable Scouting Report for week of July 10-15-from Cornell University

 

9.  Take a look at this issue of New Ag Network

 

10.   Soil Building and Organic Market Workshop

*******************************************************

 

 

1.  Published on Friday, July 7, 2006 by the Associated Press
Demand for Organic
Food Outstrips Supply
by Libby Quaid

America's appetite for organic food is so strong that supply just can't keep
up with demand. Organic products still have only a tiny slice, about 2.5
percent, of the nation's food market. But the slice is expanding at a
feverish pace.

Growth in sales of organic food has been 15 percent to 21 percent each year,
compared with 2 percent to 4 percent for total food sales.

Organic means food is grown without bug killer, fertilizer, hormones,
antibiotics or biotechnology.

Mainstream supermarkets, eyeing the success of organic retailers such as
Whole Foods, have rushed to meet demand. The Kroger Co., Safeway Inc. and
SuperValu Inc., which owns Albertson's LLC, are among those selling their
own organic brands. Wal-Mart Stores Inc. said earlier this year it would
double its organic offerings.

The number of organic farms an estimated 10,000 is also increasing, but
not fast enough. As a result, organic manufacturers are looking for
ingredients outside the United States in places like Europe, Bolivia,
Venezuela and South Africa.

That is no surprise, said Barbara Robinson, head of the Agriculture
Department's National Organic Program. The program provides the round, green
"USDA Organic" seal for certified products.

Her agency is just now starting to track organic data, but Robinson believes
the United States is importing far more organic food than it exports. That's
true of conventional food, too.

"That is how you stimulate growth, is imports generally," she said. "Your
own industry says we're tired of importing this; why should I pay for
imports when I could start producing myself?"

"We're doing a lot of scrambling," said Sheryl O'Loughlin, CEO of Clif Bar
Inc. "We have gotten to the point now where we know we can get a call for
any ingredient."

The makers of the high-energy, eat-and-run Clif Bar needed 85,000 pounds of
almonds, and they had to be organic. But the nation's organic almond crop
was spoken for. Eventually, Clif Bar found the almonds in Spain. But more
shortages have popped up: apricots and blueberries, cashews and hazelnuts,
brown rice syrup and oats.

Even Stonyfield Farm, an organic pioneer in the United States, is pursuing a
foreign supplier; Stonyfield is working on a deal to import milk powder from
New Zealand.

"I'm not suggesting we would be importing from all these places," said Gary
Hirshberg, president and CEO of Stonyfield Farm Inc. "But for transition
purposes, to help organic supply to keep up with the nation's growing
hunger, these countries have to be considered."

The dilemma of how to fill the gap between organic supply and demand is part
of a long-running debate within America's booming organic industry. For many
enthusiasts, organic is about more than the food on their plates; it's a way
to improve the environment where they live and help keep small-scale farmers
in business.

"If organic is something created in the image of sustainable agriculture, we
certainly haven't accomplished that yet," said Urvashi Rangan, a scientist
for Consumers Union. "What people do have to understand is if that stuff
comes in from overseas, and it's got an organic label on it, it had to meet
USDA standards in order to get here."

The issue causes mixed feelings for Travis Forgues, an organic dairy farmer
in Vermont.

"I don't like the idea of it coming in from out of this country, but I don't
want them to stop growing organic because of that," Forgues said. "I want
people to say, `Let's do that here, give a farmer another avenue to make a
livable wage.'"

A member of the farmer-owned Organic Valley cooperative, Forgues got his
dairy farm certified nearly 10 years ago. Organic Valley supplies milk to
Stonyfield.

Switching to organic is a difficult proposition. Vegetable grower Scott
Woodard is learning through trial and error on his Putnam Valley, N.Y.,
farm. One costly mistake: Conventional farmers can plant seeds when they
want and use pesticides to kill hungry insect larvae. If Woodard had waited
three weeks to plant, the bugs that ate his seeds would have hatched and
left. Organic seeds can be double the price of conventional.

"There's not a lot of information out there," Woodard said. "We try to do
the best we can. Sometimes it's too late, but then we learn for next time."

Stonyfield and Organic Valley are working to increase the number of organic
farms, paying farmers to help them switch or boost production. Stonyfield,
together with farmer-owned cooperative Organic Valley, expects to spend
around $2 million on incentives and technical help in 2006, Hirshberg said.

Other companies offer similar help. And the industry's Organic Trade
Association is trying to become more of a resource for individual farmers.

Caren Wilcox, the group's executive director, described how an Illinois
farmer showed up in May at an industry show in Chicago.

"He said, `I want to get certified. Help me,'" Wilcox said. "It was a smart
thing to do, but the fact that he had to get into his car and go down to
McCormick Center says something about the availability of information."

In the meantime, manufacturers like Clif Bar and Stonyfield still prefer to
buy organic ingredients, wherever they come from, instead of conventional
crops in the U.S.

"Anybody who's helping to take toxins out of the biosphere and use less
poisonous chemicals in agriculture is a hero of mine," Hirshberg said.
"There's enormous opportunity here for everybody to win, large and small."

Copyright © 2006 The Associated Press

 

 

2.  Stop the commercial planting of genetically engineered plums - the first temperate GE tree!

 

The US Department of Agriculture is accepting public comments between now and Saturday, July 17, 2006 on a petition that would allow commercial growing and marketing of the first genetically engineered (GE) plum trees. If approved, this would remove all regulatory oversight of this GE variety by USDA, a virus-resistant plum tree known as the Honey Sweet Pox Potyvirus Resistant plum. This would open the door to GE varieties of many other related stone fruits, such as peaches, apricots, cherries and almonds, that are susceptible to the same virus. Ironically, this virus is not even found in the US today according to the USDA, and is certainly not a significant agricultural problem here.

 

The USDA admits that this GE plum will contaminate both organic and conventional non-genetically engineered plum orchards if it is approved. Since all commercial plum trees are cultivars that are relatively cross compatible within the same species, Prunus domestica, contamination via GE plum pollen carried by bees and other insects will infiltrate the plum orchards of organic and conventional growers. The proposed buffer zones between GE plums and other plums will not prevent genetic contamination from being spread by pollinating insects. Because this GE plum tree is also the first genetically engineered temperate tree proposed for commercial planting, it also opens the door to the commercialization of GE varieties of other temperate trees such as poplars, pines, and walnuts.

 

The one GE fruit tree that has previously been approved, a virus resistant Hawaiian papaya, has caused extensive contamination of organic, conventional and wild papaya orchards on most of the Hawaiian Islands in just a few years. This contamination has spread far more quickly than the USDA predicted in its initial assessment. Once native and cultivated plum varieties are contaminated with transgenic pollen, and the resulting seeds are planted, there is no calling it back.

 

This petition has implications for all other GE tree species, as the USDA and the industry want to gauge what the public's reaction will be. It is critical that all concerned about the threat of GE foods and GE trees respond to this USDA petition. Several hundred field trials of GE trees have been conducted already, many for forest trees, such as Poplar, Loblolly Pine, and Sweetgum, that grow on millions of acres in natural environments in the U.S.

 

[Sample Comments to submit below.  Please add any additional comments of your own, but remember to include the docket # at the top of your comments.]

 

The following comments are in reference to Docket No. APHIS-2006-0084. I oppose the deregulation of genetically engineered plum trees for the following reasons:

 

1. Genetic contamination is a serious threat. Flowers and fruit in organic and conventional plum orchards will become contaminated with GE plum genes via pollen transported by bees and other insects that travel several miles in search of pollen. The result is that organic and conventional plum growers will lose their markets for non-GE plums as DNA testing confirms the contamination, as it has with GE papayas in Hawaii. An organic tree might remain organic itself, but the seeds will become contaminated, and the trees planted from these seeds will have contaminated fruit.

 

 2. The approval of GE plums would be a precedent setting step by USDA, opening the floodgates for more GE trees including fruit, nut, ornamental, paper-pulp, and timber species, as well as trees engineered for soil remediation, and other traits. Approximately 80 species and varieties of trees are currently undergoing gene splicing research and development for commercial use. Many of these are native species important to ecosystems in much of the U.S.

 

3. There is a serious concern about the genetic stability of the inserted genes in GE plum trees. USDA claims that the plum pox viral resistance gene and other inserted genes are sufficiently genetically stable, but the testing has only been performed over ten years and not the entire pollen-producing life span of a plum tree.

 

 4. The plum pox virus is not currently known to exist in the US as a problem for plum growers. Thus there is no justification for exposing other trees, plants, insects and people to the various hazards posed by GE plums.

 

 5.  The deregulatory petition completely ignores potential effects on bees and other pollinator species. Although unintended effects are common in GE crops there is very little assessment of possible environmental impacts from unintended effects. There are no studies that would allow us to evaluate the potential hazards of GE tree pollen for a variety of insects, or for consumers of honey. We also do not know how animals and insects that browse on plum leaves might be affected.

 

6. The USDA's environmental assessment admits that the GE plum readily hybridizes within its species. Thus, there may be a significant potential for gene flow into native plum varieties. Wild plum trees are perennial species living for several decades and populations exist in dozens of states from coast to coast.  GE plum trees will be long lived, and capable of contaminating orchards and native plum tree populations for several decades. One GE plum tree will be able to produce thousands of GE seeds and extensive quantities of GE pollen, and will be capable of spreading fertile GE plum seeds and pollen into the environment for many years. The petition did not adequately evaluate the relative fitness of GE plum varieties as compared to native plums; it is possible that the GE varieties would become more successful in natural settings, and out-compete non-GE varieties. The USDA claim that contamination would be positive by reducing potential reservoirs for harboring the plum pox virus in the wild is unsupported by any data.

 

7. There has been no short-term or long-term safety testing or feeding trials for toxicity and other adverse effects of the genes inserted into the GE plum trees. GE plums have not been tested on animals, birds or humans for safety.  Toxicity tests are necessary since unintended genetic effects are known to occur with gene splicing. USDA has ignored the need for scientific studies of gene splicing and for comprehensive studies of the environmental consequences of GE plantings.

 

The US Department of Agriculture is accepting public comments between now and Saturday, July 17, 2006 on the petition to formally deregulate and allow commercial growing and marketing of GE plums.

We apologize for the inconvenient process to submit your comments - the USDA is no longer accepting public comment via email or fax.

  

To submit a comment using the Internet, go to http://www.regulations.gov.

In the "Agency" box, select "Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service" from the drop-down menu; select "NOTICES" as the Document Type and APHIS-2006-0084 as the "Keyword or ID." Then press "submit" to submit or view public comments as well as the agency's supporting materials; click just beneath "Add Comments" and scroll down to submit your letter.

 

To submit your comments via mail, make sure your letter is postmarked no later than Saturday, July 17th, and send an original and three copies with your name and address to Docket No. APHIS-2006-0084, Regulatory Analysis and Development, PPD, APHIS, Station 3A-03.8, 4700 River Road, Unit 118, Riverdale, MD 20737-1238.

 

Feel free to copy and paste any or all of the 7 points above, along with any comments of your own.  Please forward this widely among your friends and other contacts.

 

 


 

 

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Vicki Morrone

Organic Vegetable and Crop Outreach Specialist

Michigan State University

C.S. Mott Sustainable Food Systems

303 Natural Resources Bldg.

East Lansing, MI 48824

517-353-3542

517-282-3557 (cell)

517-353-3834 (fax)

 

 

If you would like to access a searchable archive of the all the previous Mich-Organic listserv postings copy this URL and paste in your browser address field http://list.msu.edu/archives/mich-organic.html ------_=_NextPart_002_01C6AA7C.52CF6DF7-- ------_=_NextPart_001_01C6AA7C.52CF6DF7 Content-Type: image/gif; name="image001.gif" Content-Transfer-Encoding: base64 Content-ID: <[log in to unmask]> Content-Description: image001.gif Content-Location: image001.gif R0lGODlhIAAKAPIGAP///5mZmTMzM2ZmZv/MM8zMzP///wAAACH/C01TT0ZGSUNFOS4wGAAAAAxt c09QTVNPRkZJQ0U5LjAIEUxdiAAh/wtNU09GRklDRTkuMBgAAAAMY21QUEpDbXAwNzEyAAAAB09t t6UAIfkEAQAABgAsAAAAACAACgAAA0VouszzMErY6hog683BaEUoKhhAnGhKFJRVYWpMRItoF2SG Cnyvfq4GTCYD3mw506nnSwGDFyXxB40CAtisVvusTr4SRgIAOw= ------_=_NextPart_001_01C6AA7C.52CF6DF7-- ========================================================================Date: Tue, 18 Jul 2006 11:11:49 -0400 Reply-To: Vicki Morrone <[log in to unmask]> Sender: MI organic growers seeking info and ideas <[log in to unmask]> From: Vicki Morrone <[log in to unmask]> Subject: part 2 of 3 MIME-Version: 1.0 Content-Type: multipart/related; boundary="----_=_NextPart_001_01C6AA7C.7F1D0059"; type="multipart/alternative" This is a multi-part message in MIME format. ------_=_NextPart_001_01C6AA7C.7F1D0059 Content-Type: multipart/alternative; boundary="----_=_NextPart_002_01C6AA7C.7F1D0059" ------_=_NextPart_002_01C6AA7C.7F1D0059 Content-Type: text/plain; charset="US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable 3. Farmers market returns Thursday, July 06, 2006 By Gary W. Morrison The Grand Rapids Press GRAND RAPIDS -- West Michigan Environmental Action Council's weekly farmers market returns after a one-year hiatus. The council and Divine Grace Church are opening the market July 13 in a parking lot across from the church at Franklin Street SE and Fuller Avenue on the city's Southeast Side. The market will be open Thursdays from 1 to 6 p.m. through Oct. 12, said Tom Cary, director of sustainable and agriculture systems for the council. Each month, plans are to have special events, such as a fried green tomato festival. The council had markets in 2003 and 2004 with funding from Michigan Department of Community Health. This year's markets are with a Kent County Health Department grant of $15,000, which helps pay Cary as a market manager. The partnership with the church provides space for the market, with the church's youth pastor assisting Cary. Youths from the church are expected to help at the market. Paul Geer, co-owner of Frozen Creek Farms, feels the location will give people easier access to fresh produce and vegetables. "Markets help both the people and small farmers," said Geer, who plans to sell freeze-dried herbs, soups and vegetable dips along with fresh produce. "It brings fresh food to the people and helps farmers who have things to sell to survive." One month in and the NEW downtown location of the Ypsi Farmer's Market (Tuesdays, 3-7 pm) is going strong, and continuing to grow! We continue to add vendors, and the rain has not kept people away! We hope that you'll stop in-- even today! Growing Hope has organic kale & collards, peas, broccoli, and more from Needlelane Farms in Tipton, as well as hydronic tomatoes grown by FFA students at the votech in Lenawee County... Steve Carpo's got APRICOTS, rasberries, and cherries(!!!)... there are great breads and baked goods, greens, potatoes, honey, & more! Today is also our first on-site Project Fresh training (about 100 attended the first series last Saturday at the Ypsi Depot Town Farmer's Market!), so we'll lots of participating moms and little ones around for extra fun! AND, the credit card and EBT (food stamp) transactions are going well... So there are many ways to shop! Join us today and every Tuesday in the Key Bank Center lot, in downtown Ypsilanti on the corner of Michigan Ave & Hamilton. Flyers are attached-- please pass along, or print & post! Amanda Maria Edmonds Executive Director, Growing Hope [log in to unmask] 734.330.7576 4. Second annual field day on Enhancing Beneficial Insects with Native Plants will be held on August 1, 2006. This 1-day event is targeted to: * farmers/growers, * Extension educators, * NRCS personnel, * Conservation District personnel, * Master Gardeners and native plant enthusiasts. In addition to what we talked about at last year's field day, this year's field day will include up-to-date information about the plants most attractive to beneficial insects,new plants we are considering for attracting beneficials, and a demonstration of native plant seeding. Please feel free to distribute to any interested individuals and groups. Field day information and registration forms are available at: http://ipm.msu.edu/plants/home.htm Thank you, Anna Fiedler ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ Anna Fiedler Graduate Student 204 Center for Integrated Plant Systems Michigan State University E. Lansing MI 48824-1311 Lab: 517-432-5282 Fax: 517-353-5598 Web: http://www.ipm.msu.edu/plants/home.htm DAHHHHH....... 5. Inconsistent Weed Control With Glyphosate Reported Illinois farmers have recently been reporting inadequate weed control "with an initial postemergence application of glyphosate in soybean," according to University of Illinois (U of I) Extension weed scientists Aaron Hager and Dawn Nordby. "The species most commonly mentioned include waterhemp, horseweed (marestail), giant ragweed, common ragweed and common lambsquarters," they report. "We have observed a similar 'decreased performance' from glyphosate-containing products for each of these species during past seasons (lambsquarters in 2001 and 2005, horseweed in 2003, giant ragweed in 2004, etc.), but it seems that inconsistent weed control with glyphosate may be as widespread in 2006 as in any previous season." Nordby and Hager list a number of possible factors that may be behind this year's glyphosate difficulties, including dry/drought conditions, weed size, insect feeding and spray application timing, rate and volume. "Past, present, and near-future weather conditions can influence herbicide performance by affecting how much herbicide enters the plant and, to some extent, how extensively the herbicide translocates within the plant following absorption," they report. "Dry soils coupled with hot, low-humidity days tend to reduce the amount of herbicide absorbed by plants. In contrast, weeds growing with adequate soil moisture typically absorb applied herbicides faster and often more thoroughly." For more information on potential reasons for problems with postemergence weed control with glyphosate products, visit the following U of I Web link: www.ipm.uiuc.edu/bulletin/article.php?id=579 . 6. Rust Movement Remains Minuscule Thanks to drought conditions in the southeastern U.S., soybean rust has stalled in its march northward, according to USDA. Soybean rust has been confirmed in only a few sentinel plots in the southeastern U.S. and has traveled no further north than southern Alabama. "We are approaching the first flowering stage for soybeans in our sentinel plots in Ohio, and it's very unlikely with these low levels of inoculum that our growers are going to have to deal with this," says Anne Dorrance, an Ohio State University plant pathologist. According to the USDA's Pest Information Platform for Extension and Education, located at sbrusa.net -- soybean rust has been confirmed on kudzu patches in 23 counties: 12 in Florida, five in Alabama, four in Georgia and one each in Louisiana and Texas. Despite the slow movement of the disease, plant pathologists and Ohio State University Extension educators will monitor the 36 sentinel plots in Ohio throughout the remainder of the growing season, says Dorrance. "There is an outside chance of disease development on soybeans that have been planted late or had to be replanted, so the monitoring must continue," she adds. "Overall, even though the disease may not appear, we still have to go through the process and collect the data, because the negative data is often more important than the positive data." Even if a sudden inoculum buildup were to occur, an epidemic in Ohio is being discounted. "At just a 3% infection level in soybean fields across the state, we would have to have 12 million spores hit every acre in the state all at the same time," notes Dorrance. "With 5 million acres, that just doesn't compute, and we'd know that soybean rust was present long before it ever reached that level because it would be everywhere." Soybean rust could enter Ohio through a variety of routes: south through Kentucky, from North Carolina over the Appalachian Mountains, or up the Mississippi River and along the Ohio River through southern Indiana and western Kentucky. For more information on soybean rust, log onto agcrops.osu.edu . For information on soybean rust recently found in Louisiana, visit the following Delta Farm Press Web link: deltafarmpress.com/news/070806rust-finding/ . Source: Ohio State University News and Media Relations 7. Julberty's Dairy has been bought out by Dean's -the huge dairy conglomerate, of dubious fame. Worst of all, besides losing a distinctly Upper Peninsula business, is that the buyout is rumored to involve Farm Credit, financing. In other words, our tax dollars are financing the dissolution of a dairy company that actively promoted RBGH-free milk products and local farms. But, the news gets worse..a CAFO (Confined Animal Facility Operation) that was planned for the Trenary area, and met with such vehement and immediate local opposition it withdrew, is now headed for Delta County and the same water guzzling, animal abusing, drug laden milk production. Once again, USDA financing through Farm Credit is assisting this move, and residents have not been made aware of the plans and potential problems that will most assuredly accompany a milk CAFO in the Upper Peninsula. Just what is it these clowns don't understand about the importance of water -clean water- open spaces and good forage and forests in our region? The CAFO was run out of the Marquette and Trenary area by alert, informed citizens who were literally willing to put their bodies on the line to show immediate opposition and informed dissent to the dirtbags even floating a proposal to jam in such a wasteful and polluting business. I am sure Delta County has people who also value their rivers, streams, fields and forests and do not see a 'factory farm' as a positive addition to the area. Please pass this message along, and I will keep trying to learn more about this, especially the governmental financing of the proposed operation. During this past year, Upper Peninsula small farms have shown once again that local, naturally produced agricultural products are sought after and provide local jobs, unique regional, healthy food. We know this, Michigan Farmers Union knows this, and we need to keep letting our friends and neighbors know too. Thanks, and yes, there will be something we can do. Yours on the up trail, sue raker Calumet, Michigan Vicki Morrone Organic Vegetable and Crop Outreach Specialist Michigan State University C.S. Mott Sustainable Food Systems 303 Natural Resources Bldg. East Lansing, MI 48824 517-353-3542 517-282-3557 (cell) 517-353-3834 (fax) If you would like to access previous postings to the Mich-Organic listserv you can copy and paste the following URL into your browser address bar http://list.msu.edu/archives/mich-organic.html ------_=_NextPart_002_01C6AA7C.7F1D0059 Content-Type: text/html; charset="US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable

 

[log in to unmask]">  3.   Farmers market returns

Thursday, July 06, 2006

By Gary W. Morrison

The Grand Rapids Press

GRAND RAPIDS -- West Michigan Environmental Action Council's weekly farmers market returns after a one-year hiatus.

The council and Divine Grace Church are opening the market July 13 in a parking lot across from the church at Franklin Street SE and Fuller Avenue on the city's Southeast Side.

The market will be open Thursdays from 1 to 6 p.m. through Oct. 12, said Tom Cary, director of sustainable and agriculture systems for the council. Each month, plans are to have special events, such as a fried green tomato festival.

The council had markets in 2003 and 2004 with funding from Michigan Department of Community Health. This year's markets are with a Kent County Health Department grant of $15,000, which helps pay Cary as a market manager.

The partnership with the church provides space for the market, with the church's youth pastor assisting Cary.

Youths from the church are expected to help at the market.

Paul Geer, co-owner of Frozen Creek Farms, feels the location will give people easier access to fresh produce and vegetables.

"Markets help both the people and small farmers," said Geer, who plans to sell freeze-dried herbs, soups and vegetable dips along with fresh produce.

"It brings fresh food to the people and helps farmers who have things to sell to survive."

One month in and the NEW downtown location of the Ypsi Farmer's Market (Tuesdays, 3-7 pm) is going strong, and continuing to grow!  We continue to add vendors, and the rain has not kept people away!   We hope that you'll stop in-- even today!  Growing Hope has organic kale & collards, peas, broccoli, and more from Needlelane Farms in Tipton, as well as hydronic tomatoes grown by FFA students at the votech in Lenawee County... Steve Carpo's got APRICOTS, rasberries, and cherries(!!!)... there are great breads and baked goods, greens, potatoes, honey, & more!   

 

Today is also our first on-site Project Fresh training (about 100 attended the first series last Saturday at the Ypsi Depot Town Farmer's Market!), so we'll lots of participating moms and little ones around for extra fun!  AND, the credit card and EBT (food stamp) transactions are going well... So there are many ways to shop!

 

Join us today and every Tuesday in the Key Bank Center lot, in downtown Ypsilanti on the corner of Michigan Ave & Hamilton.  Flyers are attached-- please pass along, or print & post!

 

Amanda Maria Edmonds                                                

Executive Director, Growing Hope                        

[log in to unmask]

734.330.7576

 

4.  Second annual field day on Enhancing Beneficial Insects with Native Plants will be held on August 1, 2006.

 

This 1-day event is targeted to:

  • farmers/growers,
  • Extension educators,
  • NRCS personnel,
  • Conservation District personnel,
  • Master Gardeners and native plant enthusiasts.


In addition to what we talked about at last year's field day, this year's field day will include up-to-date information about the plants most attractive to beneficial insects,new plants we are considering for attracting beneficials, and a demonstration of native plant seeding.
Please feel free to distribute to any interested individuals and groups.
Field day information and registration forms are available at:
http://ipm.msu.edu/plants/home.htm
Thank you,
Anna Fiedler
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Anna Fiedler
Graduate Student
204 Center for Integrated Plant Systems
Michigan State University
E. Lansing MI 48824-1311
Lab: 517-432-5282
Fax: 517-353-5598
Web: http://www.ipm.msu.edu/plants/home.htm

DAHHHHH…….

5.  Inconsistent Weed Control With Glyphosate Reported


Illinois farmers have recently been reporting inadequate weed control "with an initial postemergence application of glyphosate in soybean," according to University of Illinois (U of I) Extension weed scientists Aaron Hager and Dawn Nordby.

"The species most commonly mentioned include waterhemp, horseweed (marestail), giant ragweed, common ragweed and common lambsquarters," they report. "We have observed a similar 'decreased performance' from glyphosate-containing products for each of these species during past seasons (lambsquarters in 2001 and 2005, horseweed in 2003, giant ragweed in 2004, etc.), but it seems that inconsistent weed control with glyphosate may be as widespread in 2006 as in any previous season."

Nordby and Hager list a number of possible factors that may be behind this year's glyphosate difficulties, including dry/drought conditions, weed size, insect feeding and spray application timing, rate and volume. "Past, present, and near-future weather conditions can influence herbicide performance by affecting how much herbicide enters the plant and, to some extent, how extensively the herbicide translocates within the plant following absorption," they report. "Dry soils coupled with hot, low-humidity days tend to reduce the amount of herbicide absorbed by plants. In contrast, weeds growing with adequate soil moisture typically absorb applied herbicides faster and often more thoroughly."

For more information on potential reasons for problems with postemergence weed control with glyphosate products, visit the following U of I Web link: www.ipm.uiuc.edu/bulletin/article.php?id=579.

6.  Rust Movement Remains Minuscule


Thanks to drought conditions in the southeastern U.S., soybean rust has stalled in its march northward, according to USDA. Soybean rust has been confirmed in only a few sentinel plots in the southeastern U.S. and has traveled no further north than southern Alabama.

"We are approaching the first flowering stage for soybeans in our sentinel plots in Ohio, and it's very unlikely with these low levels of inoculum that our growers are going to have to deal with this," says Anne Dorrance, an Ohio State University plant pathologist. According to the USDA's Pest Information Platform for Extension and Education, located at sbrusa.net -- soybean rust has been confirmed on kudzu patches in 23 counties: 12 in Florida, five in Alabama, four in Georgia and one each in Louisiana and Texas.

Despite the slow movement of the disease, plant pathologists and Ohio State University Extension educators will monitor the 36 sentinel plots in Ohio throughout the remainder of the growing season, says Dorrance. "There is an outside chance of disease development on soybeans that have been planted late or had to be replanted, so the monitoring must continue," she adds. "Overall, even though the disease may not appear, we still have to go through the process and collect the data, because the negative data is often more important than the positive data."

Even if a sudden inoculum buildup were to occur, an epidemic in Ohio is being discounted. "At just a 3% infection level in soybean fields across the state, we would have to have 12 million spores hit every acre in the state all at the same time," notes Dorrance. "With 5 million acres, that just doesn't compute, and we'd know that soybean rust was present long before it ever reached that level because it would be everywhere."

Soybean rust could enter Ohio through a variety of routes: south through Kentucky, from North Carolina over the Appalachian Mountains, or up the Mississippi River and along the Ohio River through southern Indiana and western Kentucky. For more information on soybean rust, log onto agcrops.osu.edu. For information on soybean rust recently found in Louisiana, visit the following Delta Farm Press Web link: deltafarmpress.com/news/070806rust-finding/.
[log in to unmask]" alt="Right-click here to download pictures. To help protect your privacy, Outlook prevented automatic download of this picture from the Internet.">
Source: Ohio State University News and Media Relations

 

7. Julberty’s Dairy has been  bought out by Dean's -the huge dairy conglomerate, of dubious fame. 

 

Worst of all, besides losing a distinctly Upper Peninsula business, is that the buyout is rumored to involve Farm Credit, financing.  In other words, our tax dollars are financing the dissolution of a dairy company that actively promoted RBGH-free milk products and local farms.

 

But, the news gets worse..a CAFO  (Confined Animal Facility Operation) that was planned for the Trenary area, and met with such vehement and immediate local opposition it withdrew, is now headed for Delta County and the same water guzzling, animal abusing, drug laden milk production.  Once again, USDA financing through Farm Credit is assisting this move, and residents have not been made aware of the plans and potential problems that will most assuredly accompany a milk CAFO in the Upper Peninsula.  Just what is it these clowns don't understand about the importance of water -clean water- open spaces and good forage and forests in our region?

 

The CAFO was run out of the Marquette and Trenary area by alert, informed citizens who were literally willing to put their bodies on the line to show immediate opposition and informed dissent to the dirtbags even floating a proposal to jam in such a wasteful and polluting business.  I am sure Delta County has people who also value their rivers, streams, fields and forests and do not see a 'factory farm' as a positive addition to the area.

 

Please pass this message along, and I will keep trying to learn more about this, especially the governmental financing of the proposed operation.

 

During this past year, Upper Peninsula small farms have shown once again that local, naturally produced agricultural products are sought after and provide local jobs, unique regional, healthy food.  We know this, Michigan Farmers Union knows this, and we need to keep letting our friends and neighbors know too.

 

Thanks, and yes, there will be something we can do.

 

Yours on the up trail,

 

sue raker

 

Calumet, Michigan

 

 

Vicki Morrone

Organic Vegetable and Crop Outreach Specialist

Michigan State University

C.S. Mott Sustainable Food Systems

303 Natural Resources Bldg.

East Lansing, MI 48824

517-353-3542

517-282-3557 (cell)

517-353-3834 (fax)

 

 

If you would like to access a searchable archive of the all the previous Mich-Organic listserv postings copy this URL and paste in your browser address field http://list.msu.edu/archives/mich-organic.html ------_=_NextPart_002_01C6AA7C.7F1D0059-- ------_=_NextPart_001_01C6AA7C.7F1D0059 Content-Type: image/gif; name="image001.gif" Content-Transfer-Encoding: base64 Content-ID: <[log in to unmask]> Content-Description: image001.gif Content-Location: image001.gif R0lGODlhcgAzAPUAAP///wU2fSIeH8DN3kRonoKavsjHxxVDhe/y91lWV+Dm72OCrpCOj5GnxjRc lT46O9DZ5/Hx8XVzc4OBgTAsLaGzziRPjbHA1uPj456cnXOOtkxISVN1pqyqq9XV1bq4uWdlZQAA AAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAA AAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAACH/C01TT0ZGSUNFOS4wGAAAAAxtc09Q TVNPRkZJQ0U5LjBAaUuUKgAh/wtNU09GRklDRTkuMBgAAAAMY21QUEpDbXAwNzEyAAAAA0gAc7wA LAAAAAByADMAAAb/QIBwSCwaj0SPwQPAIJ/QqHRKBQgEk6uEIjBUi58HyCB5JKIY5pfIeAge7U0m 6VwXI966dX5dCjoSVwwGCW8MIIaBZ0Ifb0MTCQxcEiAUE0SBThiIAkwdD5aCEhsfRIVnGH1CEQIS QpKtIHAMWrStExsMQhMgHxsUQhiLqoMGV68CZ8aLkENcuquuhV4bf6tcc0JXFBEAHx1WAkKB2QCn 2gLZGVfd5l0Abo3vqusTHu8YwAARdaoReMcA0FKWDECGCCCEGHs3pNs0d9k6ZHkwBFRBA14CGtPn jiCFOmWsufNSyFZGfFc6CNjgpVQRVQr7kLm4MgNHAAvzYMRYKEMH/woS2gW9oibBwgkYw8UUJ6QQ nDdeAHjoQGtD0y4RKHxUBTPllTflhsDEGXAg2QQeKNbJiUyAsHTrNnQT1gZLU4FXkColy7QjAJXc AEiYEMitOwmDnXBl2McDJ4ZiIS9ERvBMqUVZBUCb/JCLlwlOAN8FwOlkTIpXCb67BKCaroeRT3ph hWV2IGixh0zGW5lRX1qoOb8r1AHhNQGXV1UzDSBLuXPhPmRwuY4ibHSy/2JhIFebGpxZBIAAF6Fw Bg9OMyCCM4ELGwpj2kuw2SpClgQbHpTK4GYDogndeEDBB+ExMMED4LziBhytrQTfP4Vt0Uod67RS 4WAMxkEga3ZQsf9Th0V40A6IJAazjwF6lKjiiiy26OKLMMYo44xQIFDBAgTkWMAFCACAwAEDIKFA AzjqyCMACgQQZAUBNOnkk09awEEDCgyxAJRYPunAAhUYAcEBWYaJZZBFIHBlABwUwMGTHKxJJhEK XHlAmms6iaOSQwzgAJYNDDBABQQ8uUCVQlwAJpR+DtDAnk4e0IARCjAqaKKKBopoEV8G4AChAEAg aZNvFgqmAz0KkemToSZ56RANPHkABEMwCWURrQpqxI9QFmDEAIc2eQERmR5Q6hC4OhnqBU1aMKyp veJJRLPODlFnk68KgQCWRmiQqxGWOqmrl09+66MFTYpLBLLGDqH/wKFdGlErqEV0Cy+wUDowBLZF qPokp0LIG4C5RBTg7RACN8kvEd2+eWYAyxIhaagA+AsxAOQ++SsA+BbxaQCPIrztEQhU/G2xATyh L5n62ovEAOl6jKoRCze5gBAZE6HtkwTE+/ERBX+LbpNQnEnmuzk/YSnEEhtRsJMW0Dyr0vXqHO4T 1/4rxM1AP8Gys9M2/YSsSK96Lr41E1y2vwAXceW38sL6xJ5kftpwEeSG/XIRWz/ptN5Quyr1wE8g y/aTGkDBJJlQdoyEwHa3TETeTu4ded9OFj0E2phaDsABgz/pNshASh6AsCZH26/YQ/w8edlCLN0k B3+XS2vJBLfr/68FByMBLalfJF2E65qKTnsR0zbZ7uU7C7EmEjFTezEU/gZgwcRGo946lIVj/DTd rjaMObFZGyErlhzkTsS7UC4w9xG+u+wkoaxDkDi3yReMBMlYDiqkmJyv7/684LOV8OhnJ/btTH7h c5eYRleA9QEPSpyDnvXGN7ph1cxMjVJc7Kxmo14FbYHSo1706vW5DYaKZNW6V64KUAACHMoBDfBf xECYwCNgTUzHI1bzsHSAHCLvbgC4QMUCQICDYSlHOaoclao3qQJ8SgpCBKEPhdAAaGHpeT90kgOS 6CQOUO+CMdPg/6wmhIVNAQEFsOK+QLbD7m1wASwsQAWop0K+Ef9hiBwz4NR+WAUMhmlmQmqj7MZI xyOwDni5+54QtrYGBYyQYVDQU5YOYMIqsA5yAcjeGAFGrg5V8YpSeGAAStg+KbBOX8kiIOCGoC1M mc9L0ErbEShoPEJacntEwJL3kgcAlhUhggHA4hFU9y+WvZJVyStlFFinPSCebo+Po5euiCiF4hWA ZYCU4Cpn6Mxl4nII0PKhIpGgrWma7giQu6bBokBBDSoTCswcJze3eQRymVNzSHhSn2QWhaoBcJ7/ 9KYdx5jNZ9KzCOj6leOQ0C0I5O2YklvWO58QTyjhU55SC1LlomApSuatoIZsksqyGFB4fvN6Wtqg LBeZrm5qrEnXhYNcCY3gJDFONJ9Qyt0DVfq2ljLNf/6sEuTwSa8Kcs+lFLVeELHEL4yW8WXYQ4Ks voVJMZotj3DCkiajQEysEsGfTsphLG/VPI1CaYohCx5LoSRMJIEJdnDa2OgKOQRP8XBizUvhDsWl gAFowIpmbZYGEbAn3q31rHEl4rAqIFdXEWCmV8MjliyQQwQ8koZi0ijuCjBEC7Dwr5lcFssIgADQ ipSFCzhABOFEqdZSan0OdW1rcweBBsRxjrLNrWx7FK0BtJBcByDAEvE2ytRpwIXSE+7cggAAOw= ------_=_NextPart_001_01C6AA7C.7F1D0059 Content-Type: image/gif; name="image002.gif" Content-Transfer-Encoding: base64 Content-ID: <[log in to unmask]> Content-Description: image002.gif Content-Location: image002.gif R0lGODlhAQAFAHcAMSH+GlNvZnR3YXJlOiBNaWNyb3NvZnQgT2ZmaWNlACH5BAEAAAAALAAAAAAB AAEAgAAAAAECAwICRAEAOw= ------_=_NextPart_001_01C6AA7C.7F1D0059-- ========================================================================Date: Tue, 18 Jul 2006 11:12:15 -0400 Reply-To: Vicki Morrone <[log in to unmask]> Sender: MI organic growers seeking info and ideas <[log in to unmask]> From: Vicki Morrone <[log in to unmask]> Subject: part 3 of 3 MIME-Version: 1.0 Content-Type: multipart/related; boundary="----_=_NextPart_001_01C6AA7C.8E8DFB3D"; type="multipart/alternative" This is a multi-part message in MIME format. ------_=_NextPart_001_01C6AA7C.8E8DFB3D Content-Type: multipart/alternative; boundary="----_=_NextPart_002_01C6AA7C.8E8DFB3D" ------_=_NextPart_002_01C6AA7C.8E8DFB3D Content-Type: text/plain; charset="US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable 8. Vegetable Scouting Report for week of July 10-15-from Cornell University Sweet Corn Looking at many corn fields we are finding something that goes against what we usually find in the field. European corn borer (ECB) adults normally fly between the end of May and the middle of June. After the flight, because the adults find the most mature corn most attractive, larvae populations are usually highest in the most mature corn. The percentage of ECB worms in later plantings decreases until the second flight begins in late July. This summer, we are finding more ECB worms in the second and third plantings than the first plantings. I think this is because of all the rain we had in May and June. We had an up and down flight where normally the flight peaks and then numbers go down after that. This is a guess but in any case, we are seeing higher percentages of ECB in later corn plantings as we go along. It is quick and easy to find out how much ECB you have in your fields. Walk through the field and stop randomly at 5 locations. Inspect 5 plants at each location for ECB feeding damage - holes, saw dust and windows in the leaves around the tassel. Scouting is quick because you are only looking for the presence or absence of feeding damage. If you see damage on a plant, keep a running count of that number. When you've inspected 25 plants, multiply the number of plants with holes times four and this gives you a percentage of field infestation. If you are over 15% than a control is called for. Scout your fields for tassel emergence. With the warmer weather, the tassels are opening quickly and since the ECB larvae do not like the heat, they do not stick around very long. After tassel, the larvae either drop down to the ear or they bore into the stem making them more difficult to eliminate. When you see around 30-40% of the field with the tassel just starting to stick out, make your first application. Since the field will be coming quickly, the time before your second application will be shorter, maybe 2-3 days. Keep an eye on your fields that are about to come into tassel as sprays at tassel are the most effective at controlling the worms. For organic growers, Entrust, the organic formulation of Spintor, works very well. Potatoes As stated earlier, late blight has been found on Long Island. It seems to rain about every other day. When you have 18 plus hours of over 90% RH than conditions are perfect for late blight. Now that we have late blight close to our region, it is very important to have protective fungicide sprays already on the plants. Late blight produces large black spots on the leaves. Sometimes, on the stems, you will see black areas at a stem where a spore germinated. If you find something you think is late blight, call your local Cooperative Extension office and have someone come out to positively ID the disease or call me at 518-434-0016. Leaf hopper is being found in very high numbers in most fields. Go out and flop a plant into the row and shake it, than flop the plant to the other side of the row. Inspect the ground for leaf hoppers that have fallen off the plant onto the ground. This is an easy way to see what is happening in the field. We've already started to see some burning on susceptible varieties. The edges of the leaves will turn dark brown. Eventually the whole plant will turn brown and die. It's important to pay attention to leaf hopper because they can seriously decrease yield without being very evident. For conventional growers, Phaser and Thionex are the insecticides least toxic to ladybird beetles This is important for aphid suppression. For organic growers, the options are limited. Pyganic is the only product that is organic certified that will do the job. The only other thing being found in potato fields is bacterial black leg. This is when water gets into a damaged stem and causes the stem to turn black and rot usually producing a strong smell. You often see this problem worst in spray rows where the plants are damaged by tractor wheels. Later in the season, if the heavy rains continue, you will see black leg as a result of European corn borer damage. Vine crops We found the first powdery mildew (PM) on summer squash this week. It will always be the first vine crop to develop this disease so it is a good idea to try to isolate it from your other vine crops especially cucumbers. Otherwise the PM will jump from one crop and planting to another. Be on the lookout for Phytophthora crown rot because of all the rain. Plants will wilt and the stems will decay at the soil line. Phytophthora is a common problem in many grower's fields. We usually see it later in the season when the fruit collapses. This early, with all the rain, we can see the problem on young plants. Not much to do but hope we get drier conditions. Cornell Recommends The online version of the 2006 Integrated Crop and Pest Management Guidelines for Vegetables is now available at http://www.nysaes.cornell.edu/recommends/ 9. Take a look at this issue of New Ag Network-a newsletter for and by Upper Midwest organic farmers and educators http://www.new-ag.msu.edu/ In this issue -July 12, 2006 What's causing my vegetables to wilt? Organic matter amendments and the development of disease suppressive soils Economics of organic field crops United States and regional supply of certified organic field crops and livestock Asian soybean rust update for organic producers Field day planned in Michigan: Enhancing pollination and biological control with native plants 10. Soil Building and Organic Market Workshop On August 23, 2006 Michigan State University and Morgan Compost Inc. will sponsor a workshop on soil building of organic and biological systems. We will also offer a time to visit buyers of organic produce and grains and discuss organic market opportunities. The day will feature a speaker from MidWest Biosystems, Roger Kropf, presenting Building Soil Fertility with integration of compost, cover crop and soil amendments." The day will end with a tour of compost production and incorporation of soil amendments including cover crops and compost. For information on the agenda, registration and directions please visit the web site www.mottgroup.msu.edu or call Vicki Vicki Morrone Organic Vegetable and Crop Outreach Specialist Michigan State University C.S. Mott Sustainable Food Systems 303 Natural Resources Bldg. East Lansing, MI 48824 517-353-3542 517-282-3557 (cell) 517-353-3834 (fax) If you would like to access previous postings to the Mich-Organic listserv you can copy and paste the following URL into your browser address bar http://list.msu.edu/archives/mich-organic.html ------_=_NextPart_002_01C6AA7C.8E8DFB3D Content-Type: text/html; charset="US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable

8.  Vegetable Scouting Report for week of July 10-15-from Cornell University

 

Sweet Corn

Looking at many corn fields we are finding something that goes against what we usually find in the field.  European corn borer (ECB) adults normally fly between the end of May and the middle of June.  After the flight, because the adults find the most mature corn most attractive, larvae populations are usually highest in the most mature corn.  The percentage of ECB worms in later plantings decreases until the second flight begins in late July.  This summer, we are finding more ECB worms in the second and third plantings than the first plantings.  I think this is because of all the rain we had in May and June. We had an up and down flight where normally the flight peaks and then numbers go down after that.  This is a guess but in any case, we are seeing higher percentages of ECB in later corn plantings as we go along.


It is quick and easy to find out how much ECB you have in your fields.  Walk through the field and stop randomly at 5 locations.  Inspect 5 plants at each location for ECB feeding damage - holes, saw dust and windows in the leaves around the tassel.  Scouting is quick because you are only looking for the presence or absence of feeding damage.  If you see damage on a plant, keep a running count of that number.  When you've inspected 25 plants, multiply the number of plants with holes times four and this gives you a percentage of field infestation.  If you are over 15% than a control is called for.  

Scout your fields for tassel emergence.  With the warmer weather, the tassels are opening quickly and since the ECB larvae do not like the heat, they do not stick around very long.  After tassel, the larvae either drop down to the ear or they bore into the stem making them more difficult to eliminate.  When you see around 30-40% of the field with the tassel just starting to stick out, make your first application.  Since the field will be coming quickly, the time before your second application will be shorter, maybe 2-3 days.  Keep an eye on your fields that are about to come into tassel as sprays at tassel are the most effective at controlling the worms.  For organic growers, Entrust, the organic formulation of Spintor, works very well. 

 

Potatoes
As stated earlier, late blight has been found on Long Island.  It seems to rain about every other day.  When you have 18 plus hours of over 90% RH than conditions are perfect for late blight.  Now that we have late blight close to our region, it is very important to have protective fungicide sprays already on the plants. Late blight produces large black spots on the leaves.  Sometimes, on the stems, you will see black areas at a stem where a spore germinated.  If you find something you think is late blight, call  your local Cooperative Extension office and have someone come out to positively ID the disease or call me at 518-434-0016.

Leaf hopper is being found in very high numbers in most fields.  Go out and flop a plant into the row and shake it, than flop the plant to the other side of the row. Inspect the ground for leaf hoppers that have fallen off the plant onto the ground.  This is an easy way to see what is happening in the field.  We've already started to see some burning on susceptible varieties.  The edges of the leaves will turn dark brown.  Eventually the whole plant will turn brown and die.  It's important to pay attention to leaf hopper because they can seriously decrease yield without being very evident. For conventional growers, Phaser and Thionex are the insecticides least toxic to ladybird beetles  This is important for aphid suppression.  For organic growers, the options are limited.  Pyganic is the only product that is organic certified that will do the job. 

The only other thing being found in potato fields is bacterial black leg.  This is when water gets into a damaged stem and causes the stem to turn black and rot usually producing a strong smell.  You often see this problem worst in spray rows where the plants are damaged by tractor wheels.  Later in the season, if the heavy rains continue, you will see black leg as a result of European corn borer damage. 

Vine crops
We found the first powdery mildew (PM) on summer squash this week.  It will always be the first vine crop to develop this disease so it is a good idea to try to isolate it from your other vine crops especially cucumbers.  Otherwise the PM will jump from one crop and planting to another. Be on the lookout for Phytophthora crown rot because of all the rain.  Plants will wilt and the stems will decay at the soil line.  Phytophthora is a common problem in many grower's fields.  We usually see it later in the season when the fruit collapses.  This early, with all the rain, we can see the problem on young plants.  Not much to do but hope we get drier conditions. 

Cornell Recommends
The online version of the 2006 Integrated Crop and Pest Management Guidelines for Vegetables is now available at http://www.nysaes.cornell.edu/recommends/

 

9.  Take a look at this issue of New Ag Network-a newsletter for and by Upper Midwest organic farmers and educators

http://www.new-ag.msu.edu/

In this issue –July 12, 2006

[log in to unmask]">What’s causing my vegetables to wilt?

 

[log in to unmask]">Organic matter amendments and the development of disease suppressive soils

 

[log in to unmask]">Economics of organic field crops

 

[log in to unmask]">United States and regional supply of certified organic field crops and livestock

 

[log in to unmask]">Asian soybean rust update for organic producers

 

[log in to unmask]">Field day planned in Michigan: Enhancing pollination and biological control with native plants

 

10.  Soil Building and Organic Market Workshop

 

On August 23, 2006 Michigan State University and Morgan Compost Inc. will sponsor a workshop on soil building of organic and biological systems. We will also offer a time to visit buyers of organic produce and grains and discuss organic market opportunities.  The day will feature a speaker from MidWest Biosystems, Roger Kropf, presenting Building Soil Fertility with integration of compost, cover crop and soil amendments.”  The day will end with a tour of compost production and incorporation of soil amendments including cover crops and compost.

  For information on the agenda, registration and directions please visit the web site www.mottgroup.msu.edu or call Vicki

 

Vicki Morrone

Organic Vegetable and Crop Outreach Specialist

Michigan State University

C.S. Mott Sustainable Food Systems

303 Natural Resources Bldg.

East Lansing, MI 48824

517-353-3542

517-282-3557 (cell)

517-353-3834 (fax)

 

 

If you would like to access a searchable archive of the all the previous Mich-Organic listserv postings copy this URL and paste in your browser address field http://list.msu.edu/archives/mich-organic.html ------_=_NextPart_002_01C6AA7C.8E8DFB3D-- ------_=_NextPart_001_01C6AA7C.8E8DFB3D Content-Type: image/gif; name="image001.gif" Content-Transfer-Encoding: base64 Content-ID: <[log in to unmask]> Content-Description: image001.gif Content-Location: image001.gif R0lGODlhCQAIAPQAAAalUQFhLgakUQSTSAWkUQBiLwSUSAJyOAFiLwSUSQWlUQJyNwawVwBWKQOD QP///wECAwECAwECAwECAwECAwECAwECAwECAwECAwECAwECAwECAwECAwECAwECAwECAyH/C01T T0ZGSUNFOS4wGAAAAAxtc09QTVNPRkZJQ0U5LjAQAiDF3gAh/wtNU09GRklDRTkuMBgAAAAMY21Q UEpDbXAwNzEyAAAAB09tt6UALAAAAAAJAAgAAAQfsJXlEmDvNUSHwhpyVF+2jUapBVRCgFsrwAWq ZngeAQA7 ------_=_NextPart_001_01C6AA7C.8E8DFB3D-- ========================================================================Date: Tue, 18 Jul 2006 16:03:31 -0400 Reply-To: Susan Houghton <[log in to unmask]> Sender: MI organic growers seeking info and ideas <[log in to unmask]> From: Susan Houghton <[log in to unmask]> Subject: Observations MIME-Version: 1.0 Content-type: text/plain; charset=US-ASCII Ok, so I have two spare minutes - which will rapidly disappear in weeds. I have been doing all the typical things - weeding, seeding, cultivating, harvesting, and going to markets, (and reducing the varmit population) the same as most of the other farmers on this list. Giving Tree Farm is 21 acres, 6 of it in vegetables of many kinds (over 50 different plant varieties this year), and 8 hoophouses. So we do nearly year round production (mostly greens in the winter). Our markets are local restaurants, East Lansing Food Coop, two farmer's markets and a small CSA. I started pulling some potatoes and noted what I thought were alfalfa leaf hoopers (could have been potato leaf hoopers, I really don't know enough about the differences yet to identify exactly which it was). This started me thinking that I also have made other observations, for instance: When I pulled quack grass, the soil was still moist, even though everything else was dry as a bone.... I broadcast seeded rye at the same time I planted summer squash, and the cucumber beetles didn't even attempt to work on those plants (even though there was other winter squash about 50 feet away, planted earlier, that was almost overtaken with squash beetles and cucumber beetles). So my whole point is : most of us farmers make obeservations like this daily, and then don't follow through with any action (sometimes I have time to go look it up, other times I just can't), and by the time I have time to look something up, I have forgotten what it was I wanted to know. So, what if this list could maintain an archive, or a collection of observations, and then either we would have a collection of solutions, or maybe someone could put them together for research projects. ? Whaddya think? Susan Houghton Giving Tree Farm 15433 Turner Road Lansing MI 48906 517-482-8885 [log in to unmask] Why Wait? Move to EarthLink. If you would like to access previous postings to the Mich-Organic listserv you can copy and paste the following URL into your browser address bar http://list.msu.edu/archives/mich-organic.html ========================================================================Date: Tue, 18 Jul 2006 19:55:21 -0400 Reply-To: Dr Tom Zennie <[log in to unmask]> Sender: MI organic growers seeking info and ideas <[log in to unmask]> From: Dr Tom Zennie <[log in to unmask]> Subject: Re: Observations Comments: To: Susan Houghton <[log in to unmask]> MIME-Version: 1.0 Content-Type: text/plain; format=flowed; charset="iso-8859-1"; reply-type=original Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit Sue, I like it. I like it! Day to day observations by the trained eye is so invaluable. Louis Pasteur said: "Chance favors the prepared mind" Some of our observations: Moving our potatoes just 50 feet to a new location with new ground where the hogs had been located the previous year, resulted in no potatoes beetles even though the previous year had a lot of them. Doing a second cutting of alfalfa early (in the bud stage) disrupted the alfalfa weevil timing and the alfalfa came through pretty much untouched. Yellowing of the upper leaves of most plants that are otherwise healthly may be a sign of boron deficiency. (In alfalfa it's difinitely true, soil test results) ***************************** Dr Tom Zennie 4963 E CR 900 S Cloverdale, IN 46120 765-795-5526 ----- Original Message ----- From: "Susan Houghton" <[log in to unmask]> To: <[log in to unmask]> Sent: Tuesday, July 18, 2006 4:03 PM Subject: Observations > Ok, so I have two spare minutes - which will rapidly disappear in weeds. > > I have been doing all the typical things - weeding, seeding, cultivating, > harvesting, and going to markets, (and reducing the varmit population) the > same as most of the other farmers on this list. > > Giving Tree Farm is 21 acres, 6 of it in vegetables of many kinds (over 50 > different plant varieties this year), and 8 hoophouses. So we do nearly > year round production (mostly greens in the winter). Our markets are > local > restaurants, East Lansing Food Coop, two farmer's markets and a small CSA. > > I started pulling some potatoes and noted what I thought were alfalfa leaf > hoopers (could have been potato leaf hoopers, I really don't know enough > about the differences yet to identify exactly which it was). > > This started me thinking that I also have made other observations, for > instance: > When I pulled quack grass, the soil was still moist, even though > everything > else was dry as a bone.... > > I broadcast seeded rye at the same time I planted summer squash, and the > cucumber beetles didn't even attempt to work on those plants (even though > there was other winter squash about 50 feet away, planted earlier, that > was > almost overtaken with squash beetles and cucumber beetles). > > So my whole point is : most of us farmers make obeservations like this > daily, and then don't follow through with any action (sometimes I have > time > to go look it up, other times I just can't), and by the time I have time > to > look something up, I have forgotten what it was I wanted to know. > > So, what if this list could maintain an archive, or a collection of > observations, and then either we would have a collection of solutions, or > maybe someone could put them together for research projects. ? > > Whaddya think? > > > Susan Houghton > Giving Tree Farm > 15433 Turner Road > Lansing MI 48906 > 517-482-8885 > [log in to unmask] > Why Wait? Move to EarthLink. > > If you would like to access previous postings to the Mich-Organic listserv > you can copy and paste the following URL into your browser address bar > http://list.msu.edu/archives/mich-organic.html > > If you would like to access previous postings to the Mich-Organic listserv you can copy and paste the following URL into your browser address bar http://list.msu.edu/archives/mich-organic.html ========================================================================Date: Wed, 19 Jul 2006 07:33:47 -0400 Reply-To: Susan Smalley <[log in to unmask]> Sender: MI organic growers seeking info and ideas <[log in to unmask]> From: Susan Smalley <[log in to unmask]> Subject: Re: Observations Comments: To: Susan Houghton <[log in to unmask]> In-Reply-To: <[log in to unmask]> Mime-Version: 1.0 Content-Type: multipart/alternative; boundary="=====================_1631916==.ALT" --=====================_1631916==.ALT Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"; format=flowed Susan, I think your idea is wonderful! Not only will all the observations be interesting -- and some probably puzzling, but it will also provide a way for farmers to see the extent to which their observations are similar to or different from others. It may encourage some folks to pay more attention to certain aspects of their farming. And it may suggest areas where some more systematic research would be useful and relevant. I'm also thinking how often some of my own observations just get lost because my mind moves on to other things. Does that happen to others? Maybe having a place to share observations will help some of us to "hold that thought" at least until we reach the computer to share it. Thanks for a great suggestion. I'm glad you found those two spare minutes! Susan Smalley *** At 04:03 PM 7/18/2006 -0400, Susan Houghton wrote: >Ok, so I have two spare minutes - which will rapidly disappear in weeds. > >I have been doing all the typical things - weeding, seeding, cultivating, >harvesting, and going to markets, (and reducing the varmit population) the >same as most of the other farmers on this list. > >Giving Tree Farm is 21 acres, 6 of it in vegetables of many kinds (over 50 >different plant varieties this year), and 8 hoophouses. So we do nearly >year round production (mostly greens in the winter). Our markets are local >restaurants, East Lansing Food Coop, two farmer's markets and a small CSA. > >I started pulling some potatoes and noted what I thought were alfalfa leaf >hoopers (could have been potato leaf hoopers, I really don't know enough >about the differences yet to identify exactly which it was). > >This started me thinking that I also have made other observations, for >instance: >When I pulled quack grass, the soil was still moist, even though everything >else was dry as a bone.... > >I broadcast seeded rye at the same time I planted summer squash, and the >cucumber beetles didn't even attempt to work on those plants (even though >there was other winter squash about 50 feet away, planted earlier, that was >almost overtaken with squash beetles and cucumber beetles). > >So my whole point is : most of us farmers make obeservations like this >daily, and then don't follow through with any action (sometimes I have time >to go look it up, other times I just can't), and by the time I have time to >look something up, I have forgotten what it was I wanted to know. > >So, what if this list could maintain an archive, or a collection of >observations, and then either we would have a collection of solutions, or >maybe someone could put them together for research projects. ? > >Whaddya think? > > >Susan Houghton >Giving Tree Farm >15433 Turner Road >Lansing MI 48906 >517-482-8885 >[log in to unmask] >Why Wait? Move to EarthLink. > >If you would like to access previous postings to the Mich-Organic listserv >you can copy and paste the following URL into your browser address bar > http://list.msu.edu/archives/mich-organic.html Susan B. Smalley, Ph.D. Extension Specialist C.S. Mott Group for Sustainable Food Systems at Michigan State University Department of Community, Agriculture, Recreation and Resource Studies (CARRS) 303 Natural Resources Building East Lansing, MI 48824-1222 [log in to unmask] 517.432.0049 voice 517.353.3834 fax If you would like to access previous postings to the Mich-Organic listserv you can copy and paste the following URL into your browser address bar http://list.msu.edu/archives/mich-organic.html --=====================_1631916==.ALT Content-Type: text/html; charset="us-ascii" Susan,

I think your idea is wonderful!  Not only will all the observations be interesting -- and some probably puzzling, but it will also provide a way for farmers to see the extent to which their observations are similar to or different from others.  It may encourage some folks to pay more attention to certain aspects of their farming.  And it may suggest areas where some more systematic research would be useful and relevant.

I'm also thinking how often some of my own observations just get lost because my mind moves on to other things.  Does that happen to others?  Maybe having a place to share observations will help some of us to "hold that thought" at least until we reach the computer to share it.

Thanks for a great suggestion.  I'm glad you found those two spare minutes!

Susan Smalley
***

At 04:03 PM 7/18/2006 -0400, Susan Houghton wrote:
Ok, so I have two spare minutes - which will rapidly disappear in weeds.

I have been doing all the typical things - weeding, seeding, cultivating,
harvesting, and going to markets, (and reducing the varmit population) the
same as most of the other farmers on this list.

Giving Tree Farm is 21 acres, 6 of it in vegetables of many kinds (over 50
different plant varieties this year), and 8 hoophouses.  So we do nearly
year round production (mostly greens in the winter).  Our markets are local
restaurants, East Lansing Food Coop, two farmer's markets and a small CSA. 

I started pulling some potatoes and noted what I thought were alfalfa leaf
hoopers (could have been potato leaf hoopers, I really don't know enough
about the differences yet to identify exactly which it was). 

This started me thinking that I also have made other observations, for
instance:
When I pulled quack grass, the soil was still moist, even though everything
else was dry as a bone....

I broadcast seeded rye at the same time I planted summer squash, and the
cucumber beetles didn't even attempt to work on those plants (even though
there was other winter squash about 50 feet away, planted earlier, that was
almost overtaken with squash beetles and cucumber beetles).

So my whole point is : most of us farmers make obeservations like this
daily, and then don't follow through with any action (sometimes I have time
to go look it up, other times I just can't), and by the time I have time to
look something up, I have forgotten what it was I wanted to know.

So, what if this list could maintain an archive, or a collection of
observations, and then either we would have a collection of solutions, or
maybe someone could put them together for research projects. ?

Whaddya think?


Susan Houghton
Giving Tree Farm
15433 Turner Road
Lansing MI 48906
517-482-8885
[log in to unmask]
Why Wait?  Move to EarthLink.

If you would like to access previous postings to the Mich-Organic listserv you can copy and paste the following URL into your browser address bar
 http://list.msu.edu/archives/mich-organic.html

Susan B. Smalley, Ph.D.
Extension Specialist
C.S. Mott Group for Sustainable Food Systems at Michigan State University
Department of Community, Agriculture, Recreation and Resource Studies (CARRS)
303 Natural Resources Building
East Lansing, MI 48824-1222

[log in to unmask]
517.432.0049 voice
517.353.3834 fax If you would like to access a searchable archive of the all the previous Mich-Organic listserv postings copy this URL and paste in your browser address field http://list.msu.edu/archives/mich-organic.html --=====================_1631916==.ALT-- ========================================================================Date: Wed, 19 Jul 2006 11:54:09 -0400 Reply-To: Jane Bush <[log in to unmask]> Sender: MI organic growers seeking info and ideas <[log in to unmask]> From: Jane Bush <[log in to unmask]> Subject: whole foods MIME-Version: 1.0 Content-Type: multipart/alternative; boundary="----=_NextPart_000_0013_01C6AB2A.0B5258C0" This is a multi-part message in MIME format. ------=_NextPart_000_0013_01C6AB2A.0B5258C0 Content-Type: text/plain; charset="iso-8859-1" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable Interesting article about Whole Foods and local foods http://austin.bizjournals.com/austin/stories/2006/07/03/daily7.html?t=printable If you would like to access previous postings to the Mich-Organic listserv you can copy and paste the following URL into your browser address bar http://list.msu.edu/archives/mich-organic.html ------=_NextPart_000_0013_01C6AB2A.0B5258C0 Content-Type: text/html; charset="iso-8859-1" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable

Interesting article about Whole Foods and local foods
 
If you would like to access a searchable archive of the all the previous Mich-Organic listserv postings copy this URL and paste in your browser address field http://list.msu.edu/archives/mich-organic.html ------=_NextPart_000_0013_01C6AB2A.0B5258C0-- ========================================================================Date: Fri, 21 Jul 2006 15:34:15 -0400 Reply-To: Vicki Morrone <[log in to unmask]> Sender: MI organic growers seeking info and ideas <[log in to unmask]> From: Vicki Morrone <[log in to unmask]> Subject: expereince and availability of a fogger sprayer?? MIME-Version: 1.0 Content-Type: multipart/related; boundary="----_=_NextPart_001_01C6ACFC.A73AE649"; type="multipart/alternative" This is a multi-part message in MIME format. ------_=_NextPart_001_01C6ACFC.A73AE649 Content-Type: multipart/alternative; boundary="----_=_NextPart_002_01C6ACFC.A73AE649" ------_=_NextPart_002_01C6ACFC.A73AE649 Content-Type: text/plain; charset="US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable Dear Growers, The manager of the student farm, Jeremy Moghtader asked me to help out if I could. Well we do have a listserv and perhaps some of you have experience with foggers, may like to rent one or could share your experience with Patrick at Earthworks garden in Detroit. Here is his note. Please send him your advice through the listserv and he will receive it. Or if you prefer you can email him directly at mail.cskdetroit.org and make it attn Patrick. Hope someone can help him out. Thanks Vicki this is Patrick at earthworks in detroit. I have a little problem, and was hoping you or John might be able to guide me in the proper direction. I have a serious outbreak of aphids in my asparagus. now, I usually just let things work themselves out and don't worry to much as I feel like spraying tends to just cause more problems, but its only the third year, and my research leads me to think that since the plants are so young it could cause there long term productivity to suffer, and there are just a ton, a ton of aphids. Since the foliage of the asparagus is so dense and lush (likely part of the reason for such huge outbreak) using a sprayer wouldn't really work. I need one of them backpack foggers. so the first question is do you know if there is some sort of list serve or something that I could post a request to borrow one. or is there a farmers co-op that rents them. I would really prefer that it not have been used by conventional growers though. and second I was thinking it might be best to just buy one, since I'm certain I'll have to make 3 or 4 apps to get everything in check. plus I suspect it would be a handy thing to have around since we have a good number of fruit plants that I'm just waiting to start having problems of some sort. I can't afford one of the really fancy ones, even if I could it seems sort of silly to have such a powerful one for such a small operation. I was looking at something a little cheaper, and was wondering if you had an experience with them. I just don't want to get something that's a total piece of crap. see example here http://bugsource.com/fogmaster_jr.html thanks for all you time and help, and if you know nothing could you pass this on to someone who could. hope your season is going well. M. Patrick Crouch Greenhouse Manager / Field Coordinator Earthworks Garden Project, Detroit, MI Vicki Morrone Organic Vegetable and Crop Outreach Specialist Michigan State University C.S. Mott Sustainable Food Systems 303 Natural Resources Bldg. East Lansing, MI 48824 517-353-3542 517-282-3557 (cell) 517-353-3834 (fax) If you would like to access previous postings to the Mich-Organic listserv you can copy and paste the following URL into your browser address bar http://list.msu.edu/archives/mich-organic.html ------_=_NextPart_002_01C6ACFC.A73AE649 Content-Type: text/html; charset="US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable

Dear Growers,

The manager of the student farm, Jeremy Moghtader asked me to help out if I could. Well we do have a listserv and perhaps some of you have experience with foggers, may like to rent one or could share your experience with Patrick at Earthworks garden in Detroit. Here is his note. Please send him your advice through the listserv and he will receive it. Or if you prefer you can email him directly at mail.cskdetroit.org and make it attn Patrick.

 

Hope someone can help him out.

Thanks

Vicki

 

 

 

this is Patrick at earthworks in detroit.

 

I have a little problem, and was hoping you or John might be

 

able to guide me in the proper direction.

 

 

 

I have a serious outbreak of aphids in my asparagus.  now, I usually

 

just let things work themselves out and don't worry to much as

 

I feel like spraying tends to just cause more problems, but its only

 

the third year, and my research leads me to think that since

 

the plants are so young it could cause there long term productivity

 

to suffer, and there are just a ton, a ton of aphids.

 

 

 

Since the foliage of the asparagus is so dense and lush (likely

 

part of the reason for such huge outbreak) using a sprayer wouldn't

 

really work.  I need one of them backpack foggers.

 

 

 

so the first question is do you know if there is some sort of list serve or something

 

that I could post a request to borrow one.  or is there a farmers co-op that rents them.  I

 

would really prefer that it not have been used by conventional growers though.

 

 

 

and second I was thinking it might be best to just buy one, since I'm certain I'll have

 

to make 3 or 4 apps to get everything in check.  plus I suspect it would be a handy thing

 

to have around since we have a good number of fruit plants that I'm just waiting to start having

 

problems of some sort.  I can't afford one of the really fancy ones, even if I could it seems sort of silly to have such a powerful one for such a small operation.  I was looking at something a little cheaper, and was wondering if you had an experience with them.  I just don't want to

 

get something that's a total piece of crap.  see example here http://bugsource.com/fogmaster_jr.html

 

 

 

 

 

thanks for all you time and help, and if you know nothing could you pass this on to someone who could.  hope your season is going well.

 

 

 

 

 

M. Patrick Crouch

 

Greenhouse Manager / Field Coordinator

 

Earthworks Garden Project, Detroit, MI

 

 

Vicki Morrone

Organic Vegetable and Crop Outreach Specialist

Michigan State University

C.S. Mott Sustainable Food Systems

303 Natural Resources Bldg.

East Lansing, MI 48824

517-353-3542

517-282-3557 (cell)

517-353-3834 (fax)

[log in to unmask]" align=left hspace=12 v:shapes="_x0000_s1026">

 

If you would like to access a searchable archive of the all the previous Mich-Organic listserv postings copy this URL and paste in your browser address field http://list.msu.edu/archives/mich-organic.html ------_=_NextPart_002_01C6ACFC.A73AE649-- ------_=_NextPart_001_01C6ACFC.A73AE649 Content-Type: image/jpeg; name="image001.jpg" Content-Transfer-Encoding: base64 Content-ID: <[log in to unmask]> Content-Description: image001.jpg Content-Location: image001.jpg /9j/4AAQSkZJRgABAQEAYABgAAD/2wBDAAoHBwgHBgoICAgLCgoLDhgQDg0NDh0VFhEYIx8lJCIf IiEmKzcvJik0KSEiMEExNDk7Pj4+JS5ESUM8SDc9Pjv/2wBDAQoLCw4NDhwQEBw7KCIoOzs7Ozs7 Ozs7Ozs7Ozs7Ozs7Ozs7Ozs7Ozs7Ozs7Ozs7Ozs7Ozs7Ozs7Ozs7Ozs7Ozv/wAARCABVAHADASIA AhEBAxEB/8QAHwAAAQUBAQEBAQEAAAAAAAAAAAECAwQFBgcICQoL/8QAtRAAAgEDAwIEAwUFBAQA AAF9AQIDAAQRBRIhMUEGE1FhByJxFDKBkaEII0KxwRVS0fAkM2JyggkKFhcYGRolJicoKSo0NTY3 ODk6Q0RFRkdISUpTVFVWV1hZWmNkZWZnaGlqc3R1dnd4eXqDhIWGh4iJipKTlJWWl5iZmqKjpKWm p6ipqrKztLW2t7i5usLDxMXGx8jJytLT1NXW19jZ2uHi4+Tl5ufo6erx8vP09fb3+Pn6/8QAHwEA AwEBAQEBAQEBAQAAAAAAAAECAwQFBgcICQoL/8QAtREAAgECBAQDBAcFBAQAAQJ3AAECAxEEBSEx BhJBUQdhcRMiMoEIFEKRobHBCSMzUvAVYnLRChYkNOEl8RcYGRomJygpKjU2Nzg5OkNERUZHSElK U1RVVldYWVpjZGVmZ2hpanN0dXZ3eHl6goOEhYaHiImKkpOUlZaXmJmaoqOkpaanqKmqsrO0tba3 uLm6wsPExcbHyMnK0tPU1dbX2Nna4uPk5ebn6Onq8vP09fb3+Pn6/9oADAMBAAIRAxEAPwD2aiii gAooooAKKKTIOcHp1oAWqr38EV4trISjuBtYj5WP93Pr7VNNIUVQv3nO1c+tQvDbyJ9knAk80FiG H3sYyf1FJ36Cd+hZpap6f5sYltpXMhgbart1ZSMjPv2/CrQdWYqGBK9QD0oTuCd0OooopjCiiigA ooooAKqT6naQSGIyGSUdYolLsPwXOKhuJZr+4aztZGiijOLideo/2FPr6nt9elu3toLOERW8SxoO y9/c+p96AKMk19eoditp1tjLzSkeYR32jkL9T+VM0aG3F1c3FkhFq6Iivz++Ybtz5PXqBu74qMbb 1992j3jg5W2i5ii9Mnox9yfoKvb9ScfJBbwj/bcsfyAH86Vx2JL2KWSENAQJo2DoG6EjsfqMiqZ1 FXu4N9rcxyoGzGYifToRwR75qwU1XGRPaE+hhb/4qkb7W8v7poRKiAOWBK5PJwPyqWQ466MswIwD O4w7nJHp6CseG0jju549/wBkvmmeSOfH+uVjkA/3gOmOoxxjrV8pqo6T2h9jEw/9mqKc3rxGO802 G6iPXyZMn/vlgP51Vy7Ei3tzANt7ZvkdZLceYh98feH5fjVm3u7e7UmCVX2nDAdVPuOorN0y6CXp tVuHMRXKw3OVliPoM8sv54x19Ll5YLckTRP5F0g/dzKOR7EfxL7GmIuUVUsbw3KvHMgiuYTtljzn B7Eeqnsf6irdABVPULmSMR21uR9puCVTjOwD7zn2H8yB3qW6mnhjH2e2M7scAbwoHuSe30BqKys3 id7m5kEt1KAGZRhUXsq+w/U80AS20EdpEltECFUcEnJY9yT3J606eCOdQJAWUclQeG+vrRIeSR0T B/z+FSUAUwL2RcRrFaRjpkbmA+g4H61VlaxVsXGrSyN3VZsfomKluRZGdhO0l1JnIhGXC/8AARx+ dPR7oLtttOjhXt5kgX9FBqSimW0fr5t2P9oNP/OpRJa/Z5TLcyxRmYBWV2DNhRjnrTLjUr23mMJ8 l5QMlIoJZCB74HFV49Suo382IwT/AGweaiwxyOcABScdu1IT3RMZdJ/6CNynuZ5B/OpoUaXmw1oy 4/hk2Sj9MH9aW3utRuYzJF9kcA4KsskZB9MEVFcIJOb7RA//AE0gIcj+TflQUTOk9yy22pafHMjH iaI5VT64PK/UZrQhjEMSxhmYKMAu2Sfqao6W9qWdba+llX/njK2Wj/P5h+NX3O1CfQVSJZSvo3Di +tkLTW+QVH/LVP4l+vce49zVuCeO5gSeFw8cihlYdxQnynYewBH9apNb3NhO8tlH50Erbnt9wUqx 6shPHPcHvzn1YjRphZicIv4npTulYkmtRS3CC31ezWGUOVfy9wXYQDltwGcsKANnZiMqDyQeTTh0 rKczpCs02uxRxP8AddY0UN9CSalbTYdhkur66ljAyS8+xcf8BwMUATzXVjp64lmhgyc7SQCx+neo P7SnuOLGxlkH/PWf90n15+Y/lT7OLSoITcWYthGM7pkKnp1y1W4pYp4xJDIsiN0ZGBB/GgCj/Z9x c8394zL/AM8YB5afQn7x/PHtU9xp1rcxRxtHs8r/AFTRnY0f+6R0p7X1mrsjXUIdFLMpkGVA6k+1 DXtqlutw1zCsLfdkMgCn8elAFby9Utf9XLHexj+GX93J/wB9AYP5D60o1i3Q7btJLNun79cL+DD5 f1p1xq+m2j7Li+gjbyjNhnA+QfxfSrEU8FzbiWKRJYnGQykFSKABUt5nS4VY3YDCyAAnHsae67lI rL+z6HKXmgmgiZPvyW0/l4+u0j9aTYY2iSDXyDKMxrKY5N49uhP50AarruwQcMOhpFYk4ZSD+lUC dURSReWMiqcFmiZcfkxpbS7uZL02809gxUHckMhLj8DQBoVyej6RHLdaaLjSygs4Zw/mwhVErMmC PXjODXW0UAcW2kzQXwlmgvI7QG4WJLaBZPLJlJ+4VOAy4wQP51qX2neToGn20ME9zbW0kTSwuN0j xjsR3IODj2xViC91j7d5E1iDE0zDzs4Cpk4PvxUK6prKL5Z0tpXB/wBZjarDOMgf40AOvzZ32kTW osb2GKUbsx2pDKwYYO3HJyAcEcgVa0Oe4ksI47u0a3mVMtiPYjZYgEDsSACR2zVKPVtcZhnRjgL8 x3YycAnH45AqI6t4hJZl0c7d2QhODt+vv+dAEMPh+ForEy6ahkbVJricsgzgmUgt7fd/SmwWLWGp faLnTZZbMSXIjjjh3+UzOCG2Dsyg8gcfjWk99rMbmQaeJEIQLGrYIJXLc/XjJpi6hrU7OPsP2dVh chmUtubjb/Xj2oAxW0ydILhH0pybixnW2QRBvK3O7KhPRSFK8dO1beoxG58PRLa2cvkCSMy2wj2O 8YYb128dQOnccd6Z/bGssmYtILbTtO5uSQRn2HU/iDTZ73V7q2eO40bMbLyqTMG9eCMEcigDOmt4 dV10xR6S0dvEbUlZIQm5Q8jZK9cAgdalvLFli1WyOlyTXV3Ifs06xZQKVAQ7/wCDYR046ZHWr1mt 1aXt3DaaYYoipIuJXZ3lYAbckknHXvVxbnUd257chT/Cq5IH9aTdhN2MW5+1x6bc6UNNu5rie93F 1i/dlGlDF93T7vbrntUelxteJZrBYSQzRalLPJcmPCtHvkyQ467gQMdefauuiLmJDIAH2jcB696S CCK2hWGFAka5wo6DJzTGSUUUUAFFFFABRRRQAUUUUAFFFFACUUUUALRRRQB//9k ------_=_NextPart_001_01C6ACFC.A73AE649-- ========================================================================Date: Mon, 24 Jul 2006 09:10:53 -0400 Reply-To: Vicki Morrone <[log in to unmask]> Sender: MI organic growers seeking info and ideas <[log in to unmask]> From: Vicki Morrone <[log in to unmask]> Subject: FW: expereince and availability of a fogger sprayer?? MIME-Version: 1.0 Content-Type: multipart/alternative; boundary="----_=_NextPart_001_01C6AF22.9819E8FB" This is a multi-part message in MIME format. ------_=_NextPart_001_01C6AF22.9819E8FB Content-Type: text/plain; charset="US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable Subject: RE: expereince and availability of a fogger sprayer?? Patrick, We use a back pack power spayer from Stilh which we have had for 15-20 years. We use fish & seaweed for our plants & fruit trees. You can adjust the power & rate. Costly at about $500., but it does a terrific job & is reliable. Maybe one of the Stilh dealers would rent you one to try. Good luck. Nancy Jones Keiser ________________________________ From: Vicki Morrone <[log in to unmask]> Reply-To: Vicki Morrone <[log in to unmask]> To: [log in to unmask] Subject: expereince and availability of a fogger sprayer?? Date: Fri, 21 Jul 2006 15:34:15 -0400 Dear Growers, The manager of the student farm, Jeremy Moghtader asked me to help out if I could. Well we do have a listserv and perhaps some of you have experience with foggers, may like to rent one or could share your experience with Patrick at Earthworks garden in Detroit. Here is his note. Please send him your advice through the listserv and he will receive it. Or if you prefer you can email him directly at mail.cskdetroit.org and make it attn Patrick. Hope someone can help him out. Thanks Vicki this is Patrick at earthworks in detroit. I have a little problem, and was hoping you or John might be able to guide me in the proper direction. I have a serious outbreak of aphids in my asparagus. now, I usually just let things work themselves out and don't worry to much as I feel like spraying tends to just cause more problems, but its only the third year, and my research leads me to think that since the plants are so young it could cause there long term productivity to suffer, and there are just a ton, a ton of aphids. Since the foliage of the asparagus is so dense and lush (likely part of the reason for such huge outbreak) using a sprayer wouldn't really work. I need one of them backpack foggers. so the first question is do you know if there is some sort of list serve or something that I could post a request to borrow one. or is there a farmers co-op that rents them. I would really prefer that it not have been used by conventional growers though. and second I was thinking it might be best to just buy one, since I'm certain I'll have to make 3 or 4 apps to get everything in check. plus I suspect it would be a handy thing to have around since we have a good number of fruit plants that I'm just waiting to start having problems of some sort. I can't afford one of the really fancy ones, even if I could it seems sort of silly to have such a powerful one for such a small operation. I was looking at something a little cheaper, and was wondering if you had an experience with them. I just don't want to get something that's a total piece of crap. see example here http://bugsource.com/fogmaster_jr.html thanks for all you time and help, and if you know nothing could you pass this on to someone who could. hope your season is going well. M. Patrick Crouch Greenhouse Manager / Field Coordinator Earthworks Garden Project, Detroit, MI Vicki Morrone Organic Vegetable and Crop Outreach Specialist Michigan State University C.S. Mott Sustainable Food Systems 303 Natural Resources Bldg. East Lansing, MI 48824 517-353-3542 517-282-3557 (cell) 517-353-3834 (fax) If you would like to access a searchable archive of the all the previous Mich-Organic listserv postings copy this URL and paste in your browser address field http://list.msu.edu/archives/mich-organic.html ><< image001.jpg >> If you would like to access previous postings to the Mich-Organic listserv you can copy and paste the following URL into your browser address bar http://list.msu.edu/archives/mich-organic.html ------_=_NextPart_001_01C6AF22.9819E8FB Content-Type: text/html; charset="US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable


Subject: RE: expereince and availability of a fogger sprayer??

 

Patrick,  We use a back pack power spayer from Stilh which we have had for 15-20 years.  We use fish & seaweed for  our plants & fruit trees.  You can adjust the power & rate.  Costly at about $500., but it does a terrific job & is reliable.  Maybe one of the Stilh dealers would rent you one to try.

Good luck.    Nancy Jones Keiser


From: Vicki Morrone <[log in to unmask]>
Reply-To: Vicki Morrone <[log in to unmask]>
To: [log in to unmask]
Subject: expereince and availability of a fogger sprayer??
Date: Fri, 21 Jul 2006 15:34:15 -0400

Dear Growers,

The manager of the student farm, Jeremy Moghtader asked me to help out if I could. Well we do have a listserv and perhaps some of you have experience with foggers, may like to rent one or could share your experience with Patrick at Earthworks garden in Detroit. Here is his note. Please send him your advice through the listserv and he will receive it. Or if you prefer you can email him directly at mail.cskdetroit.org and make it attn Patrick.

 

Hope someone can help him out.

Thanks

Vicki

 

 

 

this is Patrick at earthworks in detroit.

 

I have a little problem, and was hoping you or John might be

 

able to guide me in the proper direction.

 

 

 

I have a serious outbreak of aphids in my asparagus.  now, I usually

 

just let things work themselves out and don't worry to much as

 

I feel like spraying tends to just cause more problems, but its only

 

the third year, and my research leads me to think that since

 

the plants are so young it could cause there long term productivity

 

to suffer, and there are just a ton, a ton of aphids.

 

 

 

Since the foliage of the asparagus is so dense and lush (likely

 

part of the reason for such huge outbreak) using a sprayer wouldn't

 

really work.  I need one of them backpack foggers.

 

 

 

so the first question is do you know if there is some sort of list serve or something

 

that I could post a request to borrow one.  or is there a farmers co-op that rents them.  I

 

would really prefer that it not have been used by conventional growers though.

 

 

 

and second I was thinking it might be best to just buy one, since I'm certain I'll have

 

to make 3 or 4 apps to get everything in check.  plus I suspect it would be a handy thing

 

to have around since we have a good number of fruit plants that I'm just waiting to start having

 

problems of some sort.  I can't afford one of the really fancy ones, even if I could it seems sort of silly to have such a powerful one for such a small operation.  I was looking at something a little cheaper, and was wondering if you had an experience with them.  I just don't want to

 

get something that's a total piece of crap.  see example here http://bugsource.com/fogmaster_jr.html

 

 

 

 

 

thanks for all you time and help, and if you know nothing could you pass this on to someone who could.  hope your season is going well.

 

 

 

 

 

M. Patrick Crouch

 

Greenhouse Manager / Field Coordinator

 

Earthworks Garden Project, Detroit, MI

 

 

Vicki Morrone

Organic Vegetable and Crop Outreach Specialist

Michigan State University

C.S. Mott Sustainable Food Systems

303 Natural Resources Bldg.

East Lansing, MI 48824

517-353-3542

517-282-3557 (cell)

517-353-3834 (fax)

 

If you would like to access a searchable archive of the all the previous Mich-Organic listserv postings copy this URL and paste in your browser address field http://list.msu.edu/archives/mich-organic.html
><< image001.jpg >>

If you would like to access a searchable archive of the all the previous Mich-Organic listserv postings copy this URL and paste in your browser address field http://list.msu.edu/archives/mich-organic.html ------_=_NextPart_001_01C6AF22.9819E8FB-- ========================================================================Date: Mon, 24 Jul 2006 09:15:36 -0400 Reply-To: Vicki Morrone <[log in to unmask]> Sender: MI organic growers seeking info and ideas <[log in to unmask]> From: Vicki Morrone <[log in to unmask]> Subject: FW: Fwd: GR Press article on local organic boom MIME-Version: 1.0 Content-Type: multipart/alternative; boundary="----_=_NextPart_001_01C6AF23.40C8487B" This is a multi-part message in MIME format. ------_=_NextPart_001_01C6AF23.40C8487B Content-Type: text/plain; charset="US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable This message comes from our listserv members, Nancy Keiser. Thank you for sharing this info. ________________________________ Subject: FW: Fwd: GR Press article on local organic boom >>To those of you who are certified organic growers, this article was stated to be an article on "organics." Following this email will be another email that questions the author's article & the confusion he has created and then his response to my questions. We have a lot of educating to do if his main intention was to do an article on "organics." Feel free to write a response if you are interested. Grand Rapids Press. Peace, Nancy Jones Keiser >> >>-----Original Message----- >>From: Farms Without Harm [mailto:[log in to unmask]] >>Sent: Sunday, July 09, 2006 1:16 PM >>To: farms without harm >>Cc: gail >>Subject: GR Press article on local organic boom >> >> >> >>In case you missed it... >> >> >> >o?< >> >>Picks of the crop regarding organic foods >> >> >> >> >> >>Sunday, July 09, 2006 >> >>By Matt Vandebunte >> >>The Grand Rapids Press >> >> >> >>A pair of bumblebees buzzed amid the chirping birds as Mary Jane >>Halloran emerged from a field with a bag of freshly picked peas in >>her hand and a black dusting of dirt on her legs. >> >>"Look at that soil," she marveled and held up the garden produce. >>"You can take your kids here and show them 'Hey, this is where this >> stuff comes from. It doesn't come from a supermarket.'" >> >>The Grand Rapids woman and 250 other customers are making weekly >>treks this summer to buy organic food at Trillium Haven Farm in >>Georgetown Township. >> >>U.S. organic sales have increased by close to 20 percent annually >>for several years, as much as 10 times the rate for conventional >>food. >> >>Annual sales of certified-organic food reached nearly $14 billion >>in 2005, making up 2.5 percent of all retail food sales. >> >>And that's not counting the farm-direct buying done at "chemical- >>free" growers such as Trillium Haven. >> >>From street markets to health-food stores to restaurants, >>businesses are finding expanded outlets for their organic products. >> >>Jim and Barb Loe, of Grant, began their business in the backyard. >>Now, Funny Farm Organic Produce grows about seven acres of >>certified-organic vegetables that are sold at farm markets and >>Harvest Health Foods stores. >> >>"We started out basically as a garden for the family, and it just >>grew from there," said Jim Loe, who installed roofing and siding >>before becoming a farmer. "We just didn't want chemicals in the >>food for our family. >> >>"(At first) every time we'd go to market, people would ask us 'What >> does organic mean?' More people are becoming aware." >> >> >> >>Companies jump in >> >>Organic -- a method of producing food that does not use toxic >>pesticides and chemical fertilizers -- has moved beyond farm >>stands. >> >>Old Orchard Brands in Sparta joined the movement in 2004. Now the >>nation's sixth-largest producer of bottled juice, it received its >>USDA certification that year for organic apple and grape juices. >> >>Up in the Leelanau Peninsula, Leland Cherry Co. announced last week >> its tart-cherry products will be distributed by Whole Foods >>Market, the Texas-based grocery chain that is a leading >>distributor of natural and organic foods. >> >>Multinational companies and retail giants are taking notice. >> >>Wal-Mart Inc. has asked suppliers to increase organic product >>lines, and Kellogg Co. has launched organic versions of Rice >>Krispies, Frosted Mini-Wheats and Raisin Bran cereals. >> >>Michigan's largest grocery chain, Meijer Inc. stocks 40 to 60 fresh >> organic produce items and 15 to 20 dry organic products such as >>raisins, croutons and dressings, said Jim Spilka, vice president of >> produce. >> >>"It's more than a niche," he said. "You have organic customers in >>all markets. It is one of our fastest-growing categories." >> >>Shoppers are driving the surge in demand, said Ronnie Cummins, >>national director of the Organic Consumers Association. >> >>"Health is cited by two-thirds of (consumers) as their primary >>reason for starting to shift to organic," he said. "It's a one-way >>street that very few consumers ever go back, and over time they buy >> more and more." >> >>Organic foods generally cost more to produce because they are grown >> without pesticides and chemical fertilizers. But it also tends to >> give farmers a bigger return on investment since it sells for >>higher prices. >> >>Many farms are labeled "organic" for meeting U.S. Department of >>Agriculture regulations, while others abide by the organic >>philosophy without pursuing certification. >> >>"There's no reason to use poisons if you're going to grow food to >>eat," said Nancy Keiser, a certified organic grower at Agriculture >>& Health Alive LLC in Marne. "We want to do things according to >>God's plan." >> >> >> >>Price squeeze possible >> >>As supply aims to get in line with demand, some smaller farmers >>worry about the impact of large-scale retailers getting into the >>game. >> >>Greater availability might lead to more awareness of organic food, >>but it also could drive down prices and reduce the profit margin >>that enables small, organic farmers to survive. >> >>For example, 2004 wholesale prices for organic broccoli were 153 >>percent higher than conventional broccoli, according to a USDA >>study. Organic carrots brought a 148 percent premium. >> >>"I'm afraid the 'organic' word is going to become diluted," said >>Cathy Halinski, who farms seven acres of organic fruit at EverGreen >> Lane Farm in Fennville. "It's a whole different philosophy of >>growing. It's a relationship with the land and the people we feed >>from it." >> >>Susan Smalley, a specialist at Michigan State University's >>Extension Service, said large growers are becoming curious about >>making the switch to organic. >> >>"Ten years ago, if you even heard the 'O' word in a group of >>conventional farmers, you'd get dirty looks," Smalley said. "In a >>number of cases, farmers can do better growing and marketing >>(higher priced) organic." >> >>But that margin could get squeezed by price-conscious retailers >>such as Wal-Mart, Smalley said. >> >>"There's a big question in many people's minds about what's going >>to happen to the market," she said. "At least in other product >>lines, they (Wal-Mart) seem willing to go across the globe to find >>what they want." >> >>Cummins fears Wal-Mart and other large retailers might push organic >> supply chains overseas to drive down prices. >> >>He argues farm subsidies should be given to help U.S. growers make >>the transition to organic. >> >>"We're still subsidizing conventional crops, but we're not looking >>to the future," Cummins said. "The writing is pretty much on the >>wall. (Organic growers) are the small farms that are making it. >> >>"(After three years), they don't really need any subsidies because >>they get a fair price for their product." >> >>Some towns are doing their part to support those farmers. >> >>For example, Woodbury County in Iowa this year enacted a policy >>requiring purchase of organic food grown within 100 miles for >>county functions that include food. The county also provides tax >>incentives to farms for organic conversions. >> >>Though conventional food might be cheaper, the organic industry >>argues the costs associated with pollution from pesticides, >>government crop subsidies and diet-related health problems make it >>pricier in the long run. >> >> >> >>Room for everyone >> >>The Organic Trade Association thinks the alarm is unwarranted. >> >>Large food corporations will play a role in growing the organic >>business. As they increase demand, more growers will make the >>switch, said Barbara Haumann, spokeswoman for the group which >>represents 1,700 farmers, retailers and corporations like Kraft and >> Dole. >> >>"Somehow, 'large' has gotten a bad rap," she said. "Some people >>think the sky is falling for the small farmer. >> >>"There's room for all size farmers in organic." >> >>At the other end of the retail spectrum is Harvest Health Foods. >> >>It is a small family business that sells organic products, >>including ice cream, chocolate bunny grahams and dog biscuits, at >>its three stores in Grand Rapids, Cascade Township and Hudsonville. >> >>It does not even try to compete with Wal-Mart or Meijer. A gallon >>of organic milk at its Hudsonville store fetches $4.99 and grapes >>go for $4.59 per pound. >> >>"We'll continue to be a niche player," owner Henry Atsma said. >>"Everything you see in a conventional store you'll find in a >>natural store, but it's not going to have the chemicals and >>additives. >> >>"Our belief is that it is much healthier. (Comparing prices) is >>kind of like how does a 200-mile-per-hour Ferrari compete with a >>Chevette?" >> >> >> >>Freshly picked >> >>Dave and Helen Lundberg have operated Ingraberg Farm east of >>Rockford for 18 years, and still use a rototiller and push-behind >>planter to farm about 22 acres. >> >>They believe global organic-supply chains cannot compete with the >>freshness of farm-direct produce. >> >>"I'm not fearful because I have 100 percent confidence in the >>quality and flavor and nutrition of our produce," Helen Lundberg >>said. "(Customers) know it has not been on a truck for seven to 10 >>days." >> >>Among Ingaberg's customers is the popular Grand Rapids restaurant, >>Bistro Bella Vita. >> >>About 20 percent of the menu there featured organic ingredients >>when the restaurant opened in 1997. That portion now stands at >>about three-fourths, general manager James Berg said. >> >>Organic costs the restaurant about 20 percent more than >>conventional food, Berg said, but buying locally saves on the >>middleman and transportation costs. >> >>Especially as gas prices rise, farmers will find growing demand >>from restaurants for locally produced, chemical-free produce, he >>predicted. >> >>"In another five to six years, this will be the norm, especially >>with what's going on with energy," Berg said. >> >>At Trillium Haven, Anja Mast talks about how time is running out on >> a gasoline-based conventional food system. And taking the organic >> label and "ratcheting it up to the industrial food model" is no >>solution, she said. >> >>"The thing that will save us all is small farms," said the 38-year- >>old Mast, who six years ago started the 50-acre farm on Maplewood >>Lake with her husband, Michael VanderBrug. >> >>"We don't need to talk about this as a moral, ethical problem. >>Let's talk about energy use. It's all about efficiency. >> >> > If you would like to access previous postings to the Mich-Organic listserv you can copy and paste the following URL into your browser address bar http://list.msu.edu/archives/mich-organic.html ------_=_NextPart_001_01C6AF23.40C8487B Content-Type: text/html; charset="US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable

This message comes from our listserv members, Nancy Keiser. Thank you for sharing this info.


Subject: FW: Fwd: GR Press article on local organic boom

 

 

>>To those of you who are certified organic growers, this article was stated to be an article on "organics."

Following this email will be another email that questions the author's article & the confusion he has created and then his response to my questions. We have a lot of educating to do if his main intention was to do an article on "organics."

Feel free to write a response if you are interested.  Grand Rapids Press.

Peace, Nancy Jones Keiser 
>>
>>-----Original Message-----
>>From: Farms Without Harm [mailto:[log in to unmask]]
>>Sent: Sunday, July 09, 2006 1:16 PM
>>To: farms without harm
>>Cc: gail
>>Subject: GR Press article on local organic boom
>>
>>
>>
>>In case you missed it...
>>
>>
>>
>o?<
>>
>>Picks of the crop regarding organic foods
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>Sunday, July 09, 2006
>>
>>By Matt Vandebunte
>>
>>The Grand Rapids Press
>>
>>
>>
>>A pair of bumblebees buzzed amid the chirping birds as Mary Jane  
>>Halloran emerged from a field with a bag of freshly picked peas in  
>>her hand and a black dusting of dirt on her legs.
>>
>>"Look at that soil," she marveled and held up the garden produce.  
>>"You can take your kids here and show them 'Hey, this is where this
>>  stuff comes from. It doesn't come from a supermarket.'"
>>
>>The Grand Rapids woman and 250 other customers are making weekly  
>>treks this summer to buy organic food at Trillium Haven Farm in  
>>Georgetown Township.
>>
>>U.S. organic sales have increased by close to 20 percent annually  
>>for several years, as much as 10 times the rate for conventional
>>food.
>>
>>Annual sales of certified-organic food reached nearly $14 billion  
>>in 2005, making up 2.5 percent of all retail food sales.
>>
>>And that's not counting the farm-direct buying done at "chemical-
>>free" growers such as Trillium Haven.
>>
>>From street markets to health-food stores to restaurants,  
>>businesses are finding expanded outlets for their organic products.
>>
>>Jim and Barb Loe, of Grant, began their business in the backyard.  
>>Now, Funny Farm Organic Produce grows about seven acres of  
>>certified-organic vegetables that are sold at farm markets and  
>>Harvest Health Foods stores.
>>
>>"We started out basically as a garden for the family, and it just  
>>grew from there," said Jim Loe, who installed roofing and siding  
>>before becoming a farmer. "We just didn't want chemicals in the  
>>food for our family.
>>
>>"(At first) every time we'd go to market, people would ask us 'What
>>  does organic mean?' More people are becoming aware."
>>
>>
>>
>>Companies jump in
>>
>>Organic -- a method of producing food that does not use toxic  
>>pesticides and chemical fertilizers -- has moved beyond farm
>>stands.
>>
>>Old Orchard Brands in Sparta joined the movement in 2004. Now the  
>>nation's sixth-largest producer of bottled juice, it received its  
>>USDA certification that year for organic apple and grape juices.
>>
>>Up in the Leelanau Peninsula, Leland Cherry Co. announced last week
>>  its tart-cherry products will be distributed by Whole Foods
>>Market,  the Texas-based grocery chain that is a leading
>>distributor of  natural and organic foods.
>>
>>Multinational companies and retail giants are taking notice.
>>
>>Wal-Mart Inc. has asked suppliers to increase organic product  
>>lines, and Kellogg Co. has launched organic versions of Rice  
>>Krispies, Frosted Mini-Wheats and Raisin Bran cereals.
>>
>>Michigan's largest grocery chain, Meijer Inc. stocks 40 to 60 fresh
>>  organic produce items and 15 to 20 dry organic products such as  
>>raisins, croutons and dressings, said Jim Spilka, vice president of
>>  produce.
>>
>>"It's more than a niche," he said. "You have organic customers in  
>>all markets. It is one of our fastest-growing categories."
>>
>>Shoppers are driving the surge in demand, said Ronnie Cummins,  
>>national director of the Organic Consumers Association.
>>
>>"Health is cited by two-thirds of (consumers) as their primary  
>>reason for starting to shift to organic," he said. "It's a one-way  
>>street that very few consumers ever go back, and over time they buy
>>  more and more."
>>
>>Organic foods generally cost more to produce because they are grown
>>  without pesticides and chemical fertilizers. But it also tends to
>>  give farmers a bigger return on investment since it sells for  
>>higher prices.
>>
>>Many farms are labeled "organic" for meeting U.S. Department of  
>>Agriculture regulations, while others abide by the organic  
>>philosophy without pursuing certification.
>>
>>"There's no reason to use poisons if you're going to grow food to  
>>eat," said Nancy Keiser, a certified organic grower at Agriculture  
>>& Health Alive LLC in Marne. "We want to do things according to  
>>God's plan."
>>
>>
>>
>>Price squeeze possible
>>
>>As supply aims to get in line with demand, some smaller farmers  
>>worry about the impact of large-scale retailers getting into the
>>game.
>>
>>Greater availability might lead to more awareness of organic food,  
>>but it also could drive down prices and reduce the profit margin  
>>that enables small, organic farmers to survive.
>>
>>For example, 2004 wholesale prices for organic broccoli were 153  
>>percent higher than conventional broccoli, according to a USDA  
>>study. Organic carrots brought a 148 percent premium.
>>
>>"I'm afraid the 'organic' word is going to become diluted," said  
>>Cathy Halinski, who farms seven acres of organic fruit at EverGreen
>>  Lane Farm in Fennville. "It's a whole different philosophy of  
>>growing. It's a relationship with the land and the people we feed  
>>from it."
>>
>>Susan Smalley, a specialist at Michigan State University's  
>>Extension Service, said large growers are becoming curious about  
>>making the switch to organic.
>>
>>"Ten years ago, if you even heard the 'O' word in a group of  
>>conventional farmers, you'd get dirty looks," Smalley said. "In a  
>>number of cases, farmers can do better growing and marketing  
>>(higher priced) organic."
>>
>>But that margin could get squeezed by price-conscious retailers  
>>such as Wal-Mart, Smalley said.
>>
>>"There's a big question in many people's minds about what's going  
>>to happen to the market," she said. "At least in other product  
>>lines, they (Wal-Mart) seem willing to go across the globe to find  
>>what they want."
>>
>>Cummins fears Wal-Mart and other large retailers might push organic
>>  supply chains overseas to drive down prices.
>>
>>He argues farm subsidies should be given to help U.S. growers make  
>>the transition to organic.
>>
>>"We're still subsidizing conventional crops, but we're not looking  
>>to the future," Cummins said. "The writing is pretty much on the  
>>wall. (Organic growers) are the small farms that are making it.
>>
>>"(After three years), they don't really need any subsidies because  
>>they get a fair price for their product."
>>
>>Some towns are doing their part to support those farmers.
>>
>>For example, Woodbury County in Iowa this year enacted a policy  
>>requiring purchase of organic food grown within 100 miles for  
>>county functions that include food. The county also provides tax  
>>incentives to farms for organic conversions.
>>
>>Though conventional food might be cheaper, the organic industry  
>>argues the costs associated with pollution from pesticides,  
>>government crop subsidies and diet-related health problems make it  
>>pricier in the long run.
>>
>>
>>
>>Room for everyone
>>
>>The Organic Trade Association thinks the alarm is unwarranted.
>>
>>Large food corporations will play a role in growing the organic  
>>business. As they increase demand, more growers will make the  
>>switch, said Barbara Haumann, spokeswoman for the group which  
>>represents 1,700 farmers, retailers and corporations like Kraft and
>>  Dole.
>>
>>"Somehow, 'large' has gotten a bad rap," she said. "Some people  
>>think the sky is falling for the small farmer.
>>
>>"There's room for all size farmers in organic."
>>
>>At the other end of the retail spectrum is Harvest Health Foods.
>>
>>It is a small family business that sells organic products,  
>>including ice cream, chocolate bunny grahams and dog biscuits, at  
>>its three stores in Grand Rapids, Cascade Township and Hudsonville.
>>
>>It does not even try to compete with Wal-Mart or Meijer. A gallon  
>>of organic milk at its Hudsonville store fetches $4.99 and grapes  
>>go for $4.59 per pound.
>>
>>"We'll continue to be a niche player," owner Henry Atsma said.  
>>"Everything you see in a conventional store you'll find in a  
>>natural store, but it's not going to have the chemicals and
>>additives.
>>
>>"Our belief is that it is much healthier. (Comparing prices) is  
>>kind of like how does a 200-mile-per-hour Ferrari compete with a  
>>Chevette?"
>>
>>
>>
>>Freshly picked
>>
>>Dave and Helen Lundberg have operated Ingraberg Farm east of  
>>Rockford for 18 years, and still use a rototiller and push-behind  
>>planter to farm about 22 acres.
>>
>>They believe global organic-supply chains cannot compete with the  
>>freshness of farm-direct produce.
>>
>>"I'm not fearful because I have 100 percent confidence in the  
>>quality and flavor and nutrition of our produce," Helen Lundberg  
>>said. "(Customers) know it has not been on a truck for seven to 10  
>>days."
>>
>>Among Ingaberg's customers is the popular Grand Rapids restaurant,  
>>Bistro Bella Vita.
>>
>>About 20 percent of the menu there featured organic ingredients  
>>when the restaurant opened in 1997. That portion now stands at  
>>about three-fourths, general manager James Berg said.
>>
>>Organic costs the restaurant about 20 percent more than  
>>conventional food, Berg said, but buying locally saves on the  
>>middleman and transportation costs.
>>
>>Especially as gas prices rise, farmers will find growing demand  
>>from restaurants for locally produced, chemical-free produce, he  
>>predicted.
>>
>>"In another five to six years, this will be the norm, especially  
>>with what's going on with energy," Berg said.
>>
>>At Trillium Haven, Anja Mast talks about how time is running out on
>>  a gasoline-based conventional food system. And taking the organic
>>  label and "ratcheting it up to the industrial food model" is no  
>>solution, she said.
>>
>>"The thing that will save us all is small farms," said the 38-year-
>>old Mast, who six years ago started the 50-acre farm on Maplewood  
>>Lake with her husband, Michael VanderBrug.
>>
>>"We don't need to talk about this as a moral, ethical problem.  
>>Let's talk about energy use. It's all about efficiency.
>>
>>
>

If you would like to access a searchable archive of the all the previous Mich-Organic listserv postings copy this URL and paste in your browser address field http://list.msu.edu/archives/mich-organic.html ------_=_NextPart_001_01C6AF23.40C8487B-- ========================================================================Date: Mon, 24 Jul 2006 14:07:57 -0400 Reply-To: Vicki Morrone <[log in to unmask]> Sender: MI organic growers seeking info and ideas <[log in to unmask]> From: Vicki Morrone <[log in to unmask]> Subject: FW: expereince and availability of a fogger sprayer?? Comments: To: [log in to unmask] MIME-Version: 1.0 Content-Type: multipart/alternative; boundary="----_=_NextPart_001_01C6AF4C.22F2BD03" This is a multi-part message in MIME format. ------_=_NextPart_001_01C6AF4C.22F2BD03 Content-Type: text/plain; charset="US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable Please note those who are sending to Pat re fogger sprayer, he is now on the listserv so you can send him info to [log in to unmask] Thanks for this great feedback Vicki ________________________________ From: [log in to unmask] [mailto:[log in to unmask]] Sent: Saturday, July 22, 2006 6:21 AM To: Vicki Morrone Subject: Re: expereince and availability of a fogger sprayer?? Vicki - - I tried to send this to Patrick but it came back would you please send it to him: Hi Pat - -I am Stan from Traverse City area. I use a back pack sprayer they cost $100 NEW available anywhere. What are you spraying - - Soaps, Oils? I am an Organic Grower near Northport (orchards) and I support local Not For Profits with Fund raisers by having them pick apples for resale through their Church or other group I would like to know about what you are doing and offer to you what help we can Stan Silverman Good Neighbor Farms of Leelanau County 231-271-5679 If you would like to access previous postings to the Mich-Organic listserv you can copy and paste the following URL into your browser address bar http://list.msu.edu/archives/mich-organic.html ------_=_NextPart_001_01C6AF4C.22F2BD03 Content-Type: text/html; charset="US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable

Please note those who are sending to Pat re fogger sprayer, he is now on the listserv so you can send him info to [log in to unmask]

 

Thanks for this great feedback

Vicki

 

 

 


From: [log in to unmask] [mailto:[log in to unmask]]
Sent: Saturday, July 22, 2006 6:21 AM
To: Vicki Morrone
Subject: Re: expereince and availability of a fogger sprayer??

 

Vicki - - I tried to send this to Patrick but it came back would you please send it to him:

 

 

Hi Pat - -I am Stan from Traverse City area. I use a back pack sprayer they cost $100 NEW available anywhere. What are you spraying - - Soaps, Oils?

 

I am an Organic Grower near Northport (orchards) and I support local Not For Profits with Fund raisers by having them pick apples for resale through their Church or other group

 

I would like to know about what you are doing and offer to you what help we can

 

Stan Silverman

Good Neighbor Farms of Leelanau County

231-271-5679

 

 

If you would like to access a searchable archive of the all the previous Mich-Organic listserv postings copy this URL and paste in your browser address field http://list.msu.edu/archives/mich-organic.html ------_=_NextPart_001_01C6AF4C.22F2BD03-- ========================================================================Date: Mon, 24 Jul 2006 15:26:47 -0400 Reply-To: Susan Houghton <[log in to unmask]> Sender: MI organic growers seeking info and ideas <[log in to unmask]> From: Susan Houghton <[log in to unmask]> Subject: Wheat for cover crop MIME-Version: 1.0 Content-type: text/plain; charset=US-ASCII I would like to plant wheat as a cover crop (looking for an efficient way of providing more mulch for potatoes and pumpkins, winter squash.....so I am looking for a variety that would produce more stalks, and the amount of wheat grain does not matter........anyone have suggestions? Also, I have heard that barley as a cover really improves the production of carrots. So is there a local variety of barley to grow as a cover? Thanks! Susan Susan Houghton Giving Tree Farm 15433 Turner Road Lansing MI 48906 517-482-8885 [log in to unmask] Why Wait? Move to EarthLink. If you would like to access previous postings to the Mich-Organic listserv you can copy and paste the following URL into your browser address bar http://list.msu.edu/archives/mich-organic.html ========================================================================Date: Mon, 24 Jul 2006 15:35:37 -0400 Reply-To: Susan Houghton <[log in to unmask]> Sender: MI organic growers seeking info and ideas <[log in to unmask]> From: Susan Houghton <[log in to unmask]> Subject: Re: expereince and availability of a fogger sprayer?? Comments: To: Vicki Morrone <[log in to unmask]> MIME-Version: 1.0 Content-Type: multipart/alternative; boundary="----=_NextPart_84815C5ABAF209EF376268C8" ------=_NextPart_84815C5ABAF209EF376268C8 Content-type: text/plain; charset=US-ASCII Hi Patrick. Johnny's has a back back sprayer that holds 4 gallons of water for about $100. We have one, but we use it for foliar spray of manganese, kelp/and or fish on a regular basis, so although I would be glad to lend it to you, the lending would be really short term and may not meet your schedule at all. Have you tried just washing them off with a strong spray of water? That would be my first line of defense! Also you are probably right, the lush growth is an indication of more than enough nitrogen, which in my mind is like creating a "diabetic" plant - too much "sugar"seems to attract the insects, as it weakens the plant. So a little extra water won't hurt anything now, and may even reduce the ratio a little..........???????? Susan ----- Original Message ----- From: Vicki Morrone To: [log in to unmask] Sent: 7/21/2006 3:31:58 PM Subject: expereince and availability of a fogger sprayer?? Dear Growers, The manager of the student farm, Jeremy Moghtader asked me to help out if I could. Well we do have a listserv and perhaps some of you have experience with foggers, may like to rent one or could share your experience with Patrick at Earthworks garden in Detroit. Here is his note. Please send him your advice through the listserv and he will receive it. Or if you prefer you can email him directly at mail.cskdetroit.org and make it attn Patrick. Hope someone can help him out. Thanks Vicki this is Patrick at earthworks in detroit. I have a little problem, and was hoping you or John might be able to guide me in the proper direction. I have a serious outbreak of aphids in my asparagus. now, I usually just let things work themselves out and don't worry to much as I feel like spraying tends to just cause more problems, but its only the third year, and my research leads me to think that since the plants are so young it could cause there long term productivity to suffer, and there are just a ton, a ton of aphids. Since the foliage of the asparagus is so dense and lush (likely part of the reason for such huge outbreak) using a sprayer wouldn't really work. I need one of them backpack foggers. so the first question is do you know if there is some sort of list serve or something that I could post a request to borrow one. or is there a farmers co-op that rents them. I would really prefer that it not have been used by conventional growers though. and second I was thinking it might be best to just buy one, since I'm certain I'll have to make 3 or 4 apps to get everything in check. plus I suspect it would be a handy thing to have around since we have a good number of fruit plants that I'm just waiting to start having problems of some sort. I can't afford one of the really fancy ones, even if I could it seems sort of silly to have such a powerful one for such a small operation. I was looking at something a little cheaper, and was wondering if you had an experience with them. I just don't want to get something that's a total piece of crap. see example here http://bugsource.com/fogmaster_jr.html thanks for all you time and help, and if you know nothing could you pass this on to someone who could. hope your season is going well. M. Patrick Crouch Greenhouse Manager / Field Coordinator Earthworks Garden Project, Detroit, MI Vicki Morrone Organic Vegetable and Crop Outreach Specialist Michigan State University C.S. Mott Sustainable Food Systems 303 Natural Resources Bldg. East Lansing, MI 48824 517-353-3542 517-282-3557 (cell) 517-353-3834 (fax) If you would like to access a searchable archive of the all the previous Mich-Organic listserv postings copy this URL and paste in your browser address field http://list.msu.edu/archives/mich-organic.html If you would like to access previous postings to the Mich-Organic listserv you can copy and paste the following URL into your browser address bar http://list.msu.edu/archives/mich-organic.html ------=_NextPart_84815C5ABAF209EF376268C8 Content-Type: text/html; charset=US-ASCII
Hi Patrick.
 
Johnny's has a back back sprayer that holds 4 gallons of water for about $100.  We have one, but we use it for foliar spray of manganese, kelp/and or fish on a regular basis, so although I would be glad to lend it to you, the lending would be really short term and may not meet your schedule at all. 
 
Have you tried just washing them off with a strong spray of water?  That would be my first line of defense!  Also you are probably right, the lush growth is an indication of more than enough nitrogen, which in my mind is like creating a "diabetic" plant - too much "sugar"seems to attract the insects, as it weakens the plant.   So a little extra water won't hurt anything now, and may even reduce the ratio a little..........????????
 
Susan
 
----- Original Message -----
From: [log in to unmask] href="mailto:[log in to unmask]">Vicki Morrone
To: [log in to unmask] href="mailto:[log in to unmask]">[log in to unmask]
Sent: 7/21/2006 3:31:58 PM
Subject: expereince and availability of a fogger sprayer??

Dear Growers,

The manager of the student farm, Jeremy Moghtader asked me to help out if I could. Well we do have a listserv and perhaps some of you have experience with foggers, may like to rent one or could share your experience with Patrick at Earthworks garden in Detroit. Here is his note. Please send him your advice through the listserv and he will receive it. Or if you prefer you can email him directly at mail.cskdetroit.org and make it attn Patrick.

 

Hope someone can help him out.

Thanks

Vicki

 

 

 

this is Patrick at earthworks in detroit.

 

I have a little problem, and was hoping you or John might be

 

able to guide me in the proper direction.

 

 

 

I have a serious outbreak of aphids in my asparagus.  now, I usually

 

just let things work themselves out and don't worry to much as

 

I feel like spraying tends to just cause more problems, but its only

 

the third year, and my research leads me to think that since

 

the plants are so young it could cause there long term productivity

 

to suffer, and there are just a ton, a ton of aphids.

 

 

 

Since the foliage of the asparagus is so dense and lush (likely

 

part of the reason for such huge outbreak) using a sprayer wouldn't

 

really work.  I need one of them backpack foggers.

 

 

 

so the first question is do you know if there is some sort of list serve or something

 

that I could post a request to borrow one.  or is there a farmers co-op that rents them.  I

 

would really prefer that it not have been used by conventional growers though.

 

 

 

and second I was thinking it might be best to just buy one, since I'm certain I'll have

 

to make 3 or 4 apps to get everything in check.  plus I suspect it would be a handy thing

 

to have around since we have a good number of fruit plants that I'm just waiting to start having

 

problems of some sort.  I can't afford one of the really fancy ones, even if I could it seems sort of silly to have such a powerful one for such a small operation.  I was looking at something a little cheaper, and was wondering if you had an experience with them.  I just don't want to

 

get something that's a total piece of crap.  see example here http://bugsource.com/fogmaster_jr.html

 

 

 

 

 

thanks for all you time and help, and if you know nothing could you pass this on to someone who could.  hope your season is going well.

 

 

 

 

 

M. Patrick Crouch

 

Greenhouse Manager / Field Coordinator

 

Earthworks Garden Project, Detroit, MI

 

 

Vicki Morrone

Organic Vegetable and Crop Outreach Specialist

Michigan State University

C.S. Mott Sustainable Food Systems

303 Natural Resources Bldg.

East Lansing, MI 48824

517-353-3542

517-282-3557 (cell)

517-353-3834 (fax)

 

If you would like to access a searchable archive of the all the previous Mich-Organic listserv postings copy this URL and paste in your browser address field http://list.msu.edu/archives/mich-organic.html
If you would like to access a searchable archive of the all the previous Mich-Organic listserv postings copy this URL and paste in your browser address field http://list.msu.edu/archives/mich-organic.html ------=_NextPart_84815C5ABAF209EF376268C8-- ========================================================================Date: Mon, 24 Jul 2006 23:16:35 -0400 Reply-To: Suzanna Raker <[log in to unmask]> Sender: MI organic growers seeking info and ideas <[log in to unmask]> From: Suzanna Raker <[log in to unmask]> Subject: backpack sprayer MIME-version: 1.0 Content-type: text/plain; charset=US-ASCII; format=flowed Content-transfer-encoding: 7BIT Hello there: Yes, aphids are usually a sign of too much nitrogen, and also hot, humid conditions seem to bring them on. Sprayers. _SOLO_ makes what seems to be the most sturdy and user-friendly. They clean up well, hold pressure, and definitely deliver a good, fine spray. If you need a power model, check out True Value Hardware's model that mists. Solo does make sprayers that carry other 'boutique' garden supplier's labels. Best prices for them seem to be occasional sales from Peaceful Valley Farm Supply. If you get one, be sure to keep vaseline or similar substance around to use around the gasket for the tank (the top, where you pump up the pressure) It helps a great deal to have an even seal, if you apply some around the contact surface. Ladybugs love aphids. (I suppose you already know this, but they are handy to help out.) We use our three Solo sprayers almost constantly, for Bt, fish and kelp mix with surfactant, and also a garlic oil and hot pepper wax mix that helps deter everything from deer to leaf rollers. When changing formulas in the sprayer, be sure to clean the tip and hose thoroughly. If you don't, the interaction of different sprays can sometimes lead to coagulated particles clogging up the nozzle. Keep a spare nozzle around, in a clean, dry container, if possible. Good luck. -sue If you would like to access previous postings to the Mich-Organic listserv you can copy and paste the following URL into your browser address bar http://list.msu.edu/archives/mich-organic.html ========================================================================Date: Mon, 31 Jul 2006 10:08:15 -0400 Reply-To: Vicki Morrone <[log in to unmask]> Sender: MI organic growers seeking info and ideas <[log in to unmask]> From: Vicki Morrone <[log in to unmask]> Subject: attention all organic grain/forage farmers!! Comments: To: Dan Rossman <[log in to unmask]> MIME-Version: 1.0 Content-Type: multipart/related; boundary="----_=_NextPart_001_01C6B4AA.A13A275B"; type="multipart/alternative" This is a multi-part message in MIME format. ------_=_NextPart_001_01C6B4AA.A13A275B Content-Type: multipart/alternative; boundary="----_=_NextPart_002_01C6B4AA.A13A275B" ------_=_NextPart_002_01C6B4AA.A13A275B Content-Type: text/plain; charset="US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable Organic Valley has hired Kristine Fedewa to compile a directory of inputs and resources for organic dairy farmers. This coop is attempting to start a milk pool from Michigan, but as we all know, affordable organic, less traveled grain access is a challenge. For those who are seeking an expanded or additional organic crop, this may be your opportunity. If you produce grain or forage or know of a farmer who produces for sale please contact Kristine Fedewa at [log in to unmask] and let her know what you have to offer, your local and contact info. Some folks are not happy about the price that Organic Valley is paying and feel it should be higher. I have been in contact with the Organic Valley folks setting up this expansion in Michigan and trying to get some specifics of how they can REALLY help the situation. I will keep all informed as I get the info. Please forward this info to any farmers who may benefit. The Organic Valley farmer hot-line is 888-809-9297 where you can leave your questions and number and they will return your call. Thank you Vicki Vicki Morrone Organic Vegetable and Crop Outreach Specialist Michigan State University C.S. Mott Sustainable Food Systems 303 Natural Resources Bldg. East Lansing, MI 48824 517-353-3542 517-282-3557 (cell) 517-353-3834 (fax) If you would like to access previous postings to the Mich-Organic listserv you can copy and paste the following URL into your browser address bar http://list.msu.edu/archives/mich-organic.html ------_=_NextPart_002_01C6B4AA.A13A275B Content-Type: text/html; charset="US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable

Organic Valley has hired Kristine Fedewa to compile a directory of inputs and resources for organic dairy farmers. This coop is attempting to start a milk pool from Michigan, but as we all know, affordable organic, less traveled grain access is a challenge.  For those who are seeking an expanded or additional organic crop, this may be your opportunity. If you produce grain or forage or know of a farmer who produces for sale please contact Kristine Fedewa at [log in to unmask]  and let her know what you have to offer, your local and contact info. Some folks are not happy about the price that Organic Valley is paying and feel it should be higher. I have been in contact with the Organic Valley folks setting up this expansion in Michigan and trying to get some specifics of how they can REALLY help the situation. I will keep all informed as I get the info.

 

Please forward this info to any farmers who may benefit. The Organic Valley farmer hot-line is 888-809-9297 where you can leave your questions and number and they will return your call.

 

Thank you

Vicki

 

Vicki Morrone

Organic Vegetable and Crop Outreach Specialist

Michigan State University

C.S. Mott Sustainable Food Systems

303 Natural Resources Bldg.

East Lansing, MI 48824

517-353-3542

517-282-3557 (cell)

517-353-3834 (fax)

[log in to unmask]" align=left hspace=12 v:shapes="_x0000_s1026">

 

If you would like to access a searchable archive of the all the previous Mich-Organic listserv postings copy this URL and paste in your browser address field http://list.msu.edu/archives/mich-organic.html ------_=_NextPart_002_01C6B4AA.A13A275B-- ------_=_NextPart_001_01C6B4AA.A13A275B Content-Type: image/jpeg; name="image001.jpg" Content-Transfer-Encoding: base64 Content-ID: <[log in to unmask]> Content-Description: image001.jpg Content-Location: image001.jpg /9j/4AAQSkZJRgABAQEAYABgAAD/2wBDAAoHBwgHBgoICAgLCgoLDhgQDg0NDh0VFhEYIx8lJCIf IiEmKzcvJik0KSEiMEExNDk7Pj4+JS5ESUM8SDc9Pjv/2wBDAQoLCw4NDhwQEBw7KCIoOzs7Ozs7 Ozs7Ozs7Ozs7Ozs7Ozs7Ozs7Ozs7Ozs7Ozs7Ozs7Ozs7Ozs7Ozs7Ozs7Ozv/wAARCABVAHADASIA AhEBAxEB/8QAHwAAAQUBAQEBAQEAAAAAAAAAAAECAwQFBgcICQoL/8QAtRAAAgEDAwIEAwUFBAQA AAF9AQIDAAQRBRIhMUEGE1FhByJxFDKBkaEII0KxwRVS0fAkM2JyggkKFhcYGRolJicoKSo0NTY3 ODk6Q0RFRkdISUpTVFVWV1hZWmNkZWZnaGlqc3R1dnd4eXqDhIWGh4iJipKTlJWWl5iZmqKjpKWm p6ipqrKztLW2t7i5usLDxMXGx8jJytLT1NXW19jZ2uHi4+Tl5ufo6erx8vP09fb3+Pn6/8QAHwEA AwEBAQEBAQEBAQAAAAAAAAECAwQFBgcICQoL/8QAtREAAgECBAQDBAcFBAQAAQJ3AAECAxEEBSEx BhJBUQdhcRMiMoEIFEKRobHBCSMzUvAVYnLRChYkNOEl8RcYGRomJygpKjU2Nzg5OkNERUZHSElK U1RVVldYWVpjZGVmZ2hpanN0dXZ3eHl6goOEhYaHiImKkpOUlZaXmJmaoqOkpaanqKmqsrO0tba3 uLm6wsPExcbHyMnK0tPU1dbX2Nna4uPk5ebn6Onq8vP09fb3+Pn6/9oADAMBAAIRAxEAPwD2aiii gAooooAKKKTIOcHp1oAWqr38EV4trISjuBtYj5WP93Pr7VNNIUVQv3nO1c+tQvDbyJ9knAk80FiG H3sYyf1FJ36Cd+hZpap6f5sYltpXMhgbart1ZSMjPv2/CrQdWYqGBK9QD0oTuCd0OooopjCiiigA ooooAKqT6naQSGIyGSUdYolLsPwXOKhuJZr+4aztZGiijOLideo/2FPr6nt9elu3toLOERW8SxoO y9/c+p96AKMk19eoditp1tjLzSkeYR32jkL9T+VM0aG3F1c3FkhFq6Iivz++Ybtz5PXqBu74qMbb 1992j3jg5W2i5ii9Mnox9yfoKvb9ScfJBbwj/bcsfyAH86Vx2JL2KWSENAQJo2DoG6EjsfqMiqZ1 FXu4N9rcxyoGzGYifToRwR75qwU1XGRPaE+hhb/4qkb7W8v7poRKiAOWBK5PJwPyqWQ466MswIwD O4w7nJHp6CseG0jju549/wBkvmmeSOfH+uVjkA/3gOmOoxxjrV8pqo6T2h9jEw/9mqKc3rxGO802 G6iPXyZMn/vlgP51Vy7Ei3tzANt7ZvkdZLceYh98feH5fjVm3u7e7UmCVX2nDAdVPuOorN0y6CXp tVuHMRXKw3OVliPoM8sv54x19Ll5YLckTRP5F0g/dzKOR7EfxL7GmIuUVUsbw3KvHMgiuYTtljzn B7Eeqnsf6irdABVPULmSMR21uR9puCVTjOwD7zn2H8yB3qW6mnhjH2e2M7scAbwoHuSe30BqKys3 id7m5kEt1KAGZRhUXsq+w/U80AS20EdpEltECFUcEnJY9yT3J606eCOdQJAWUclQeG+vrRIeSR0T B/z+FSUAUwL2RcRrFaRjpkbmA+g4H61VlaxVsXGrSyN3VZsfomKluRZGdhO0l1JnIhGXC/8AARx+ dPR7oLtttOjhXt5kgX9FBqSimW0fr5t2P9oNP/OpRJa/Z5TLcyxRmYBWV2DNhRjnrTLjUr23mMJ8 l5QMlIoJZCB74HFV49Suo382IwT/AGweaiwxyOcABScdu1IT3RMZdJ/6CNynuZ5B/OpoUaXmw1oy 4/hk2Sj9MH9aW3utRuYzJF9kcA4KsskZB9MEVFcIJOb7RA//AE0gIcj+TflQUTOk9yy22pafHMjH iaI5VT64PK/UZrQhjEMSxhmYKMAu2Sfqao6W9qWdba+llX/njK2Wj/P5h+NX3O1CfQVSJZSvo3Di +tkLTW+QVH/LVP4l+vce49zVuCeO5gSeFw8cihlYdxQnynYewBH9apNb3NhO8tlH50Erbnt9wUqx 6shPHPcHvzn1YjRphZicIv4npTulYkmtRS3CC31ezWGUOVfy9wXYQDltwGcsKANnZiMqDyQeTTh0 rKczpCs02uxRxP8AddY0UN9CSalbTYdhkur66ljAyS8+xcf8BwMUATzXVjp64lmhgyc7SQCx+neo P7SnuOLGxlkH/PWf90n15+Y/lT7OLSoITcWYthGM7pkKnp1y1W4pYp4xJDIsiN0ZGBB/GgCj/Z9x c8394zL/AM8YB5afQn7x/PHtU9xp1rcxRxtHs8r/AFTRnY0f+6R0p7X1mrsjXUIdFLMpkGVA6k+1 DXtqlutw1zCsLfdkMgCn8elAFby9Utf9XLHexj+GX93J/wB9AYP5D60o1i3Q7btJLNun79cL+DD5 f1p1xq+m2j7Li+gjbyjNhnA+QfxfSrEU8FzbiWKRJYnGQykFSKABUt5nS4VY3YDCyAAnHsae67lI rL+z6HKXmgmgiZPvyW0/l4+u0j9aTYY2iSDXyDKMxrKY5N49uhP50AarruwQcMOhpFYk4ZSD+lUC dURSReWMiqcFmiZcfkxpbS7uZL02809gxUHckMhLj8DQBoVyej6RHLdaaLjSygs4Zw/mwhVErMmC PXjODXW0UAcW2kzQXwlmgvI7QG4WJLaBZPLJlJ+4VOAy4wQP51qX2neToGn20ME9zbW0kTSwuN0j xjsR3IODj2xViC91j7d5E1iDE0zDzs4Cpk4PvxUK6prKL5Z0tpXB/wBZjarDOMgf40AOvzZ32kTW osb2GKUbsx2pDKwYYO3HJyAcEcgVa0Oe4ksI47u0a3mVMtiPYjZYgEDsSACR2zVKPVtcZhnRjgL8 x3YycAnH45AqI6t4hJZl0c7d2QhODt+vv+dAEMPh+ForEy6ahkbVJricsgzgmUgt7fd/SmwWLWGp faLnTZZbMSXIjjjh3+UzOCG2Dsyg8gcfjWk99rMbmQaeJEIQLGrYIJXLc/XjJpi6hrU7OPsP2dVh chmUtubjb/Xj2oAxW0ydILhH0pybixnW2QRBvK3O7KhPRSFK8dO1beoxG58PRLa2cvkCSMy2wj2O 8YYb128dQOnccd6Z/bGssmYtILbTtO5uSQRn2HU/iDTZ73V7q2eO40bMbLyqTMG9eCMEcigDOmt4 dV10xR6S0dvEbUlZIQm5Q8jZK9cAgdalvLFli1WyOlyTXV3Ifs06xZQKVAQ7/wCDYR046ZHWr1mt 1aXt3DaaYYoipIuJXZ3lYAbckknHXvVxbnUd257chT/Cq5IH9aTdhN2MW5+1x6bc6UNNu5rie93F 1i/dlGlDF93T7vbrntUelxteJZrBYSQzRalLPJcmPCtHvkyQ467gQMdefauuiLmJDIAH2jcB696S CCK2hWGFAka5wo6DJzTGSUUUUAFFFFABRRRQAUUUUAFFFFACUUUUALRRRQB//9k ------_=_NextPart_001_01C6B4AA.A13A275B--